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Dern Does Up Disneyland

Dern Does Up Disneyland

February seems to be the month for celebrities to visit the “Happiest Place on Earth!”

Actress Laura Dern and musician husband Ben Harper take their children to Disneyland in Anaheim, California — son Ellery Walker, 5, daughter Jaya, 2, and Ben‘s daughter Harris from a previous marriage.

Laura and Ben also hit up Malibu’s Nobu restaurant this past weekend for a combined birthday celebration with pals Jennifer Aniston and Sheryl Crow. Laura just turned 40 earlier this month on Feb. 10, Aniston and Crow just turned 38 and 45 respectively on Feb. 11.

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10 Comments

# 1

Good to celebrities are normal too, with normal vacations, the kids must have loved this!

http://www.fluix.net

# 2

Wasnt she billy bob’s exfiancee

# 3

Ben is part black, but their kids look completely white. If Ben and Laura’s kids marry a white person and have a family, can some of the black genes from their dad will pop up in their own kids? There should be some Negro somewhere in their DNA.

# 4

No, a person cannot pass on more genes giving pigment to the skin than they show already. Yes, they can pass on the pigment genes they inherited from their dad, but they won’t be darker than they are already, unless the person they have children with also passes on some pigment DNA. From the looks of it, aside from how the childern look, I somehow doubt that the Black culture is being cultivated. They are children of privilege.

# 5

Thanks for the information.

# 6
ATTN Sara Lee @ 02/19/2007 at 7:21 pm

Sara Lee, please take time to research the answer to your question instead of taking one persons explanation, and one that hasn’t provided any data to back it up. Genetics are an interesting thing, and genes can lay dormant for generations only to show up and suprise long after it’s thought they couldnt any longer. This is a fact, and I’m a living breathing part of an extended family where the “trickle down effect” of two and three generations back is still showing up regardless of the race of the present parents.

# 7
ATTN: Sara Lee Says con't @ 02/21/2007 at 12:57 am

I would like to second that. The idea that you can’t be lighter than your parents, or darker than your parents is a complete lie. First of all, anyone who is from a mixed background or has interracial family members can tell you that there really is no telling what the genetic make up of a resulting kid is. One of my parents is light and the other is dark though they are both mixed. My sister is darker but I am lighter than both parents with my grandfather’s irish red hair. I have other cousins that look “black” and have “black” parents but they ended up with recessive Blue eyes.

Oh and just to bring every body out of the Jim Crow era..the idea of Negro somewhere in your dna is indicative of complete ignorance of genetics and human evolution. Believe it or not..Race is not a genetic classification, as we are all considered part of the Human Race. Scientists can’t break down the human species farther than that, though there are different genetic traits by culture.

By now everyone should realize that everything is mixing and eventually more people are going to be mixed breeds like me (having 5 different cultural backgrounds) and the entire “pure bred” mentality will no longer be relevant

# 8

I know of an African-American family with seven kids. The father is dark-brown. Mother is fair like a Hispanic, but obviously a black woman – both of her parents were black. Out of the seven kids, 2 are dark; 3 are a lighter brown; and 2 are a little darker than the mother. They’re just all different colors and they have different hair textures, but they have the same parents. The baby girl is the spitting image of her mother.

# 9
re: SaraLee @ 02/21/2007 at 7:47 pm

And I know of a completely blond haired, blue eyed, white skin baby born to two hispanic, dark skinned parents, both of whom had European ancestors from many years ago. Yes, I agree the child can be born lighter than both parents and darker than the lighter parent, but I still believe that a child cannot inherit genes for making more pigment than either parent already had inside their genome. Perhaps if they are out in the sun more and so the genes are turned ‘on’ for producing more melanin protein, but the genes themselves are expressed in either parent to produce the protein and it is a combination of these genes that are passed onto the child. I don’t doubt that it is complex, and can creep up generations later when the right combinations of genes are passed down, but a parent can’t impart more melanin producing genetic information to their child than they already harbor inside their body.

@ATTN: Sara Lee Says con’t: Exactly! People need to realise that there is no playbook as to how a biracial child must look! They can look one way, or the other, or someways inbetween! Thats why I felt so enraged at the media’s claim that Michael Jackson is not the biological father of his kids. That is sooo ignorant and racist if you ask me!!!!! He most definately is their biological father, just as Ben is the father of his children.

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