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Brad Pitt Calls Angelina Jolie 'Brave' After Her Mastectomy

Brad Pitt Calls Angelina Jolie 'Brave' After Her Mastectomy

Brad Pitt has made his first public statement since news of his fiancee Angelina Jolie‘s cancer-preventative double mastectomy has spread across the Internet.

“Having witnessed this decision firsthand, I find Angie‘s choice, as well as so many others like her, absolutely heroic,” the 49-year-old actor told JustJared.com. “I thank our medical team for their care and focus. All I want for is for her to have a long and healthy life, with myself and our children. This is a happy day for our family.”

In case you missed it, check out Angelina‘s op-ed story about the process, which she wrote for the New York Times.

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264 Comments

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Passing Through @ 05/14/2013 at 1:06 pm

# 266 fyi12 @ 05/14/2013 at 11:01 am
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Sheryl Crow: “I commend Angelina Jolie for her courage and thoughtfulness in sharing her story today regarding her mastectomy. So brave! Ladies, please check out Angelina Jolie’s story today, especially if you have breast cancer in your family history.”
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Elizabeth Banks: “Much respect & for sharing in classy way: Angelina Jolie on why she had a double mastectomy & how it can save lives.”
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Nia Vardalos: “A moment of quiet respect for Angelina Jolie’s candor and all women’s bravery in facing this choice.”
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++++++++++++++++++++++++
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I see Ticky’s hens are weighing in. I bet every one of them speed-dialed her as soon as they heard the news.
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PS – Fvck Dr. Blew. He can’t find fault with Angie’s actions for a change so all he can do is issue a terse statement about her bravery and slink back under his rock. Asshat.

Jolie admission could prompt more cancer tests
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Credit:westernadvocate By Amy Corderoy, Sarah Berry May 15, 2013

An announcement by Angelina Jolie that she has had a preventative double mastectomy is likely to encourage more Australian women to test for breast cancer gene mutations, cancer groups said.

The American actress, whose mother, Marcheline Bertrand, died of ovarian cancer in 2007, had been tested and found to carry faults in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, increasing her risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

”My doctors estimated that I had an 87 per cent risk of breast cancer and a 50 per cent risk of ovarian cancer, although the risk is different in the case of each woman,” Jolie wrote in The New York Times. ”Once I knew that this was my reality, I decided to be proactive and to minimise the risk as much I could.” Jolie’s treatment began in February and finished on April 27, with the procedures remaining secret until she wrote the article on her decision.

Cancer Australia chief executive Helen Zorbas said intense interest in Jolie’s decision was likely to increase the number of Australian women seeking the gene mutation test. ”But the reality is it’s a small proportion of women who are in the situation Angelina Jolie is in, in terms of having such a strong family history and having the test.”

Up to 5 per cent of the 14,000 breast cancers diagnosed in Australia each year, or about 700 cases, were linked to inherited gene mutations, she said.

A clinician at the hereditary cancer clinic at Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, Lesley Andrews, said that in Australia the test for the mutations was not covered by Medicare.

”Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 is individually funded by each hospital,” she said. ”The criteria for women to be offered testing usually includes that there is at least a 10 per cent chance that a mutation will be identified.”

This typically meant a woman would have two or more relatives diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer, with one aged younger than 40 when diagnosed. If a woman was not covered under the hospital policy, the test cost about $2500.

The head of the breast cancer risk management clinic at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Kelly-Anne Phillips, said about one in five Australian women found to have the breast cancer gene mutations chose a preventative mastectomy.

”Having a risk-reducing mastectomy is the most effective way of reducing risk,” she said. ”It can take her from an 80 per cent risk of breast cancer to a … lower risk than an average woman has.”

Professor Zorbas said outcomes from reconstructive breast surgery could be extraordinarily good, and most women chose to have a reconstruction. ”However, women I have met who have chosen not to have reconstruction are equally happy with their decision.”

## 51 Passing Through @ 05/14/2013 at 1:06 pm
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As soon as I saw those names hang on arnt they some ones BFF’s hmm well Passing Through dont begrudge Tickys Hens you know how starved for attention they are, and they will certainly get attention especially when they mention the name “Anjelina Jolie”
Even the snake Dr Blew has changed his tune, bunch of attention Suckers.

Cancer Advocates Praise Angelina Jolie’s New York Times Mastectomy Op-Ed
Facing a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer, the actress underwent a preventative double mastectomy
By Tierney Sneed

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Those who work in cancer treatment and advocacy praised Angelina Jolie’s op-ed in the New York Times Tuesday detailing her decision to undergo a preventative double mastectomy.

“I was favorably impressed with the article,’ says Dr. Alexandra Heerdt, an attending breast surgeon at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. “It was wonderful for women who are facing this and are afraid to do this.”

Jolie wrote that she had discovered she carried the BRCA1 gene which greatly increases a woman’s chance of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Facing an 87 percent risk of developing breast cancer, she chose to undergo three months of treatments that included the mastectomy which brought the risk down to less than 5 percent.

[Q&A: Jolie's Double Mastectomy]

“One of the most important points she stressed is that this is not cosmetic surgery,” says Heerdt. “She made it clear that it was a process that she had to go through, and this is not the easiest of processes.”

Advocates agree that anytime a high-profile figure is willing to come out about such a private medical decision like this it raises awareness about the gene – which they point out is very rare – and opens up the discussion of how to handle it. Kiki Ryan, public relations manager at the breast cancer advocacy organization Susan G. Komen, says, “A lot of people will learn about the BRCA1 gene and we hope it will get them to learn more about their family history.” Amanda Davis, director of communications at the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance was pleased Jolie brought up that the BRCA1 gene also put her at risk for ovarian cancer – a “below the belt cancer” often overlooked, she says. There is no screening test for ovarian cancer and it’s one of the deadliest types, she adds.

Heerdt says the next step for women concerned by Jolie’s situation would be to examine their family history for a prevalence of breast, ovarian or rectal cancers, and, if so, then talk to their health care providers about receiving further tests for it. “It’s a very small percentage of women that would fall into the same category that Angelina Jolie is in,” she says.

[REPORT: Breast Cancer Gene Tests Won't Help Most Women]

Jolie also wrote, “I feel empowered that I made a strong choice that in no way diminishes my femininity,” and advocates were pleased Jolie — chosen “most beautiful” by both Vanity Fair and People — discussed this dimension for her decision.

“Some women feel that it will make them less of a women, make them less attractive. They have to understand that it doesn’t have to be terribly disfiguring,” says Heerdt. “It is life changing but it doesn’t have to be life ending.”

Ryan also adds it’s important to keep in mind many women wouldn’t have access to the premium health care providers available to Jolie, who was treated at the Pink Lotis Breast Cancer Center in Beverly Hills. “We need to keep working to provide local clinics with funding and research to allow under-insured, under-serviced women the same options,” she says.

Credit US News:

Passing Through @ 05/14/2013 at 1:22 pm

# 295 African Girl @ 05/14/2013 at 12:57 pm @Passing Through:
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Hey AG -
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Lamey’s got taken away by the tornado that zipped Doroth to the Land of Oz. Only Lamey landed on a grassy knoll instead. No ruby red sarkly shoes for Lamey…

thelookoflove1365 @ 05/14/2013 at 1:22 pm

Passing Through @ 05/14/2013 at 1:06 pm
# 266 fyi12 @ 05/14/2013 at 11:01 am
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Sheryl Crow: “I commend Angelina Jolie for her courage and thoughtfulness in sharing her story today regarding her mastectomy. So brave! Ladies, please check out Angelina Jolie’s story today, especially if you have breast cancer in your family history.”
.
Elizabeth Banks: “Much respect & for sharing in classy way: Angelina Jolie on why she had a double mastectomy & how it can save lives.”
,
Nia Vardalos: “A moment of quiet respect for Angelina Jolie’s candor and all women’s bravery in facing this choice.”
.
++++++++++++++++++++++++
.
I see Ticky’s hens are weighing in. I bet every one of them speed-dialed her as soon as they heard the news.
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PS – Fvck Dr. Blew. He can’t find fault with Angie’s actions for a change so all he can do is issue a terse statement about her bravery and slink back under his rock. Asshat.
================
If these Henbots have self -respect, they would not even bother to dial X and just show/give their respect & support for Angie’s action. This is health issue, & how preventive action can help women who have the same health issue as Angie.
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For them to seek approval or apology (if they ask X) just because they show support for Angie, just show to me how immature or uncaring X is. If they have to worry about X’s feeling relative to Angie’s mastectomy, then maybe they need to evaluate their friendship with X.

@Passing Through:

ITA!

Now lets see if Ticky’s mouth piece BFF, the vodka girls girl Handler will say a word..I hope she doesn’t because I will HATE her even more, which is almost impossible!

first and last post @ 05/14/2013 at 1:32 pm

from previous thread
24 tee @ 05/14/2013 at 1:57 am
re; “I’m not sure an average person would be able to afford this type of decision, financially and mentally, without having to live with the physical realities of it.”

In the US The Women’s Health and Cancer Act of 1998 requires all health insurance providers and health maintenance orgs that pay for mastectomy to pay for reconstruction, surgery and reconstruction of the opposite breast for symmetry, prostheses and tx of any complications of surgery including common side effects such accumulation of lymph in soft tissue with accompanying swelling, often of the extremities: sometimes caused by inflammation, obstruction, or removal of lymph channels.

re: 80 Susie#1 @ 05/14/2013 at 3:13 am
“There is also a downside to being tested for the gene, as I believe many insurers will deny women coverage if there is a positive result.”

Not true, health insurance companies currently can only deny coverage for a pre-existing medical problem that is currently being treated. Having any genetic disposition does not preclude insurances from covering.

re: 84 lylian @ 05/14/2013 at 3:20 am
Hi lylian,
yes under Obamacare, at least for now because the details have not been officially formalized, a person cannot be denied “access for health insurance” due to a pre-existing diagnosed and past or currently treated medical problem. However the way it is currently stated does not mean an insurance company that accepts a patient with a pre-existing medical condition will actually pay for the medical coverage but the health insurance plan probably will…possibly with a higher than normal co pay or higher annual or lifetime cap. Insurance companies are still figuring how to get around all this.

Angelina Jolie, Christine Quinn, and the Art of the New York Times Overshare
Posted by Kristin Iversen on Tue, May 14, 2013 at 1:16 PM
—————————————

Late last night, or rather, early this morning, I was doing what I typically do when I am procrastinating. I reorganized the bookshelf by my bed, I considered folding laundry, I put my Elizabeth Taylor mask on my dog and myself, I obsessively refreshed twitter. I did anything except what I was supposed to be doing because what I was supposed to be doing was transcribing an interview, and that involves the specific horrors of not only listening to my own voice, but also being reminded of a terrible habit I have, which is thinking that my interview subject needs to be entertained by me, which means that I then have to listen to the awkward patter that I subject innocent people to and so, yes, I am the worst. I also always forget to ask real questions. Ugh. But so anyway, I turned to twitter to avoid my work.

And while reading Retta’s Game of Thrones tweets was certainly entertaining enough, at a certain point, my twitter feed exploded with everyone who was still awake linking to Angelina Jolie’s New York Times Op-Ed, wherein she revealed her decision to undergo a double mastectomy as a preventive measure against the cancer that killed her mother. In Jolie’s editorial, titled “My Medical Choice,” she explains, “My mother fought cancer for almost a decade and died at 56. She held out long enough to meet the first of her grandchildren and to hold them in her arms. But my other children will never have the chance to know her and experience how loving and gracious she was…I wanted to write this to tell other women that the decision to have a mastectomy was not easy. But it is one I am very happy that I made. My chances of developing breast cancer have dropped from 87 percent to under 5 percent. I can tell my children that they don’t need to fear they will lose me to breast cancer.”

Jolie goes on to explain that she underwent genetic testing, which determined that she carries the BRCA 1 gene, and that her “doctors estimated that [she] had an 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer, although the risk is different in the case of each woman.” Her decision to undergo preventative surgery was one that she made in order to take control of a situation that makes many people feel powerless. Jolie notes that she does “not feel any less of a woman” and that she is “fortunate to have a partner, Brad Pitt, who is so loving and supportive” and who made it easier for her to go through the procedure. Jolie went public with this decision in an effort to “encourage every woman, especially if you have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, to seek out the information and medical experts who can help you through this aspect of your life, and to make your own informed choices.” Jolie freely acknowledges that, due to her economic privileges, she has access to top medical care and every option that is currently available, but insists, “It has got to be a priority to ensure that more women can access gene testing and lifesaving preventive treatment, whatever their means and background, wherever they live. The cost of testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2, at more than $3,000 in the United States, remains an obstacle for many women.”

The response to Jolie’s article has been overwhelmingly positive, The New Yorker’s Rebecca Mead writes, “Jolie’s medical decision says again what shouldn’t need re-saying: that a woman’s body is hers, that breasts are for something other than ogling, and that hard choices are made for strong reasons. Her decision to make her choice public is bold and brave and admirable. It is what celebrity is for.” There are, obviously going to be some ******** in the crowd that will be, well, ********. The Awl rounds up a few male reactions, including a tweet by “Political Director to Russell Simmons + Editor-In-Chief of Global Grind ” Michael Skolnik, which reads, “love to Angelina, but if the cure to breast cancer is that woman have to get their breasts removed before they get cancer, we are in trouble.” So, yeah. ******** are going to be ********. The important thing, though, is that people are talking. People are talking about a disease that, yes, people know about, but that still effects hundreds of thousands of women in America each year. If the example of Jolie, whose fame is in part due to her physicality, can empower other women to become better advocates for their own health, then an important precedent for the good effects that celebrity can have has been set.

Credit The L Magazine

African Girl @ 05/14/2013 at 1:40 pm

@juju:
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Lmao!!
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Thanks for that Juju, I’m doing a double facepalm for the trolls. One would think after all these years, they will be tired of being wrong.

Brad will cover Esquire mag June/July issue.

apologies for posting on both Brad & Angies threads simultaneously, wasn’t quite sure which thread would be on-going with fans

It has been a crazy day. Can’t stop thinking about Angie and her family. Lovely to see so much compassion. I ignore the ignorance of some. Best to focus o the positive. And there is so much positive to focus on.

thelookoflove1365 @ 05/14/2013 at 1:46 pm

This is even more hypocritical of that paranoid conspiracy theory peddler, cross eyed Lamey. When GP dissed the MET gala as “un fun” & “crowded,” Lamey praised GP for her honesty and telling it as it is. She even made a beeline that maybe GP is telling Anna Wintour that her yearly event is now too pedestrian for GP’s taste & not exclusive anymore. Because, you know, GP only attends exclusive events. *eye roll here*
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So Angie made public her mastectomy to help other women and all Lamey can think of is conspiracy theory about BS? Beyotch is full of sh*t and a worthless blogger & she knows it too, hence, her comments section is close to public.
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This is why I don’t mind MK of Dlisted. He makes fun of everyone, but he wrote about Angie’s mastectomy he was not nasty or conspiratorial.

Wow Aniston’S fans are heartless.

Angelina Jolie’s Cancer Risk Persists: Ovaries Still Vulnerable
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Hollywood actress and activist Angelina Jolie has had a double mastectomy to reduce her chances of getting breast cancer, saying she hopes her story will inspire other women fighting the life-threatening disease. The Oscar-winner who lost her mother, Marcheline Bertrand, to cancer in 2007 at the age of 56 disclosed that she carries an inherited gene mutation, and decided to have the preventive double mastectomy surgeries because she had a high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. The mother of six children – three adopted and three with Brad Pitt, who was at the Pink Lotus Breast Center in Southern California for ‘‘every minute of the surgeries.’’ Jolie finished three months of medical procedures at the end of April.

Many women have chosen preventive mastectomy since genetic screening for breast cancer was developed, but the move and public announcement is unprecedented from a star so young and widely known. Jolie stated in the New York Times article ‘‘My mother fought cancer for almost a decade and died. She held out long enough to meet the first of her grandchildren and to hold them in her arms. But my other children will never have the chance to know her and experience how loving and gracious she was.’’

The risk of developing cancer due to the gene varies, but Jolie says “My doctors estimated that I had an 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer, although the risk is different in the case of each woman,” wrote Jolie. The actress decided to take control of her health and have the surgeries, which decreased her chances to fewer than 5 percent. A mastectomy is an operation that removes all or part of the breast; however, the question remains what or if any preventive actions will be taken for the 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer.

She briefly addresses the effects of the surgery on the idealized sexuality and iconic womanhood that have fueled her fame. ‘‘I do not feel any less of a woman,’’ Jolie writes. ‘‘I feel empowered that I made a strong choice that in no way diminishes my femininity.’’

Jolie is a brave woman to be so proactive and enduring the preventive surgery that could have ultimately saved her life for her children sake. “I can tell my children that they don’t need to fear they will lose me to breast cancer,” Jolie said. We all can continue to pray that she seeks medical guidance ensuring they will never lose their mom to ovarian cancer since the risk it at a high percentage. In telling her story, Jolie acknowledged that surgery might not be the right choice for every woman and that’s why we urge anyone who is worried about their risk of breast cancer to talk it through with their doctor and at least the topic of cancer will continue to bring awareness to a very serious illness involving woman.

#fyi12 @ 05/14/2013 at 1:31 pm
Now lets see if Ticky’s mouth piece BFF, the vodka girls girl Handler will say a word..I hope she doesn’t because I will HATE her even more, which is almost impossible!
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ITA with you on this one Fyi, I hope she the Doghandler doesnt say any thing at all, also I hope no one gets Ticky to commnet on this subject either i hate them regardless.

Didn’t realize there was a new thread. Bringing over my last post:

Lamey is a cretin. While I’m not shocked at her asinine conjecture and constant speculation surrounding Brad and Angie’s “brand,” I had expected her to at least show some decorum and comportment regarding this announcement. But no. In her typical low-classy style, she surmises the timing of the announcement as circumspect. Really?! How about this theory Lame-ass?: Angie’s medical procedure, which took three-months, was completed on April 27. The Op-Ed piece was published very early this morning (May 14). That’s roughly a little more than two weeks time which seems plausible for some much needed rest and recuperation and receive a prognosis report from her doctors before making a public announcement and having her privacy destroyed. I’m sure for the sake of her family, her health was the priority. Not to meet some arbitrary publication deadline. And then to really show her low-classiness, Lame-ass publishes a ticky thread right after Angie’s. Talk about someone who can’t let go.

thelookoflove1365 @ 05/14/2013 at 2:11 pm

http://www.salon.com/2013/05/14/angelina_jolie%E2%80%99s_choice_not_the_only_one/
It takes courage for an international sex symbol (and renowned actress and humanitarian) to tell the public she had a double mastectomy. So I applaud Angelina Jolie for writing an excruciatingly detailed New York Times Op-Ed about the choice she made after she learned she carried the BRCA1 gene, which put her at high risk for breast cancer. She watched her mother die of ovarian cancer at 56, and her anxiety over cancer risk led to her genetic screening.
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I faced a similar anxiety: My mother died of breast cancer at 45; my grandmother was diagnosed at 48 and survived. Like Jolie, after I had a child, I became increasingly anxious about my own risk. There was no genetic testing 20 years ago, so I consulted a variety of doctors, including a genetic counselor. I was told I had an elevated risk of breast cancer, though it couldn’t be quantified (Jolie’s doctors estimated hers was 87 percent). At least one doctor recommended a double mastectomy. Another cautioned against it, noting that it can’t eliminate all risk of breast cancer (Jolie’s is now estimated at 5 percent). He railed at surgeons describing the breasts of women like me as “ticking time bombs” and advising unnecessary prophylactic mastectomies.
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I don’t know what I’d have done if I’d been told my risk was 87 percent. I do know that I chose a course of rigorous medical follow-up: an annual screening mammogram (where a radiologist reads the results immediately) and twice-yearly breast exams by a surgeon. The tiniest cyst gets emergency attention; I’ve had biopsies and ultrasounds and needle aspirations. When BRCA testing became available, I opted against it. Now, having made it past 50, it’s unlikely I carry the gene, since it tends to strike women when they’re younger. I’m so glad I didn’t listen to the alarmist doctor who wanted to treat my breasts like “ticking time bombs.” But I continue with aggressive oversight to this day.

I hope Jolie’s Op-Ed motivates women to take control of their health, getting tested if they have a strong family history of breast cancer and taking steps to minimize their risk. It must also be said that double mastectomy isn’t the only answer, and isn’t the right answer for every woman.
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Genetic testing is expensive – around $3,000 – and is rarely covered by insurance. Low-income and younger women might have reasons not to opt to remove their breasts. It’s unlikely poor women would find the level of care Jolie did, with careful attention to protecting their nipples (and with it, possibly, sexual sensation) and aesthetically pleasing reconstruction. A younger woman who doesn’t already have children might not want to lose her breasts before nursing.
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It would be a shame if Jolie’s detailed story scared some women out of being tested. It is possible that the careful monitoring and screening I chose is better even for some women who carry the gene.
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Dr. Richard Francis, the head of research at the respected British agency Breakthrough Breast Cancer, warns the Guardian that preventative mastectomy isn’t the right treatment for every woman with the gene:
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For women like Angelina it’s important that they are made fully aware of all the options that are available, including risk-reducing surgery and extra breast screening. Though Angelina decided that a preventative mastectomy was the right choice for her, this may not be the case for another woman in a similar situation. We urge anyone who is worried about their risk of breast cancer to talk it through with their doctor.
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It would be wonderful if Jolie’s essay motivated more women to learn more about their breast cancer risk. It would be sad if it scared them out of screening, or into getting unnecessary mastectomies.
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http://www.esquire.com/features/pitt-jolie-relationship?src=spr_TWITTER&spr_id=1456_8676357

The Real Life of Brangelina

By Tom Junod

Tom Junod’s profile of Brad Pitt will appear in the June/July issue, which is on newsstands at the end of the month.

When I met Brad Pitt the day after Easter, he was so tired that he was perhaps more reflective than usual. He had just finished a week of spring break with his family. He had camped out with them the night before on his property north of Santa Barbara, and he had woken up, he said, too early, as well as too wet. They had slept in tents, four of his six children, along with two of their friends, and then he had gotten all of them in a van and driven them down to LA.

“Angie too?” I asked.

“Yeah,” he said. “Angie too.”

I told him that I’d met her a few years before, when I profiled her for Esquire. She was making a movie about the wife of the murdered journalist Daniel Pearl, and the thesis of my story was that while 9/11 was supposed to make us all better — a better country and a better people — it only worked for Angelina Jolie. The story has won a kind of immortality as “The Worst Celebrity Profile Ever Written,” and when I told that to Angelina Jolie’s partner, he at first laughed and said that he hoped Esquire would use that as the title of the profile I was writing about him. Then he got serious. “But you were right,” he said. “You were right, you were right. Angie is….the best person…..”

I remembered meeting Angelina Jolie — how thin she was, how much steak she ate and wine she drank, and above all her utter self-possession. She answered every question I asked, but she was the kind of person who responded without ever simply reacting. Brad Pitt was different. He was, like a lot of men, stuck between family and work, and the day he came back to LA from spring break was the day he began the push to finish his summer zombie movie, World War Z. And so, although he was Brad Pitt, he was also a big guy, dressed in black, stained around the eyes by stress and exhaustion, who spoke leaning forward, bent at the waist, with his hands folded between his legs, and was in the habit of repeating himself between long pauses. “I’m a crap interview,” he’d warned me, but when he began talking about his family, he said twice, “I haven’t known life to be any happier,” and he said it in such a way that I never once thought to doubt him.

This was April 1. I didn’t know then what I know now — that a month earlier, his partner, Angelina Jolie, commenced the series of surgeries that would end, a month later, with her pre-emptive double mastectomy. Over the next few weeks, I talked to several of Pitt’s close friends. They must have known what the couple was enduring, but of course they never told me. One of them, however, called me back after our first interview. His name was Frank Pollaro, and he’d spoken about the furniture business he’d started with Brad Pitt, and about Pitt’s excellent eye. But he wanted to say something else, so he called Brad, and asked if he was at liberty to speak about Brad’s relationship with Angelina. He was, and so when he called back, he told me what he’d seen at Brad’s house — “once I walked in and Angie was standing there and Zahara walked up and said, ‘Daddy, you’re not going to start making out with Mommy again, are you?’ And it’s like that. This is a guy who has tried not to do any sexy scenes with other women since he’s met Angelinia. He’s crazy about her, and she’s the same way about him. No matter how hard he’s working, if one of those kids runs by the window he’ll get out of his chair and give them a kiss. And I don’t think I’ve ever seen Angie without one of those children in her arms.”

It’s the nature of marriage — or, in the case Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, a committed relationship — to both invite and repel scrutiny. We have no idea how any two people make a life together, much less two people as professionally exhibitionistic and privately enigmatic as the two combined in the public mind as “Brangelina.” But I will say this: a long time ago, Brad Pitt left college in Missouri to come to LA and act in movies. He insists that he wasn’t looking for stardom, only a sense of life and possibility larger than what he left behind. He insists that he was searching the chimera of Hollywood for something real. This morning, the mother of his children revealed in the New York Times that he was “at the Pink Lotus Breast Center, where I was treated, for every minute of the surgeries.”

You do not have to be a celebrity, only a father and a man in love with a woman, to know that life doesn’t get any more real than that.

@annon:

OMG This is such a beautiful piece!

I am no brad pitt fan. As a matter of fact I’ve said some really mean -but truthful- things about him here on this site…but I do think he really loves her. I remember one quote that’s something like ” the only thing that keeps me up at night is losing angie or the kids.” That pretty much says it all in regards to how he feels about this situation. I still think he’s a shallow fool -one reason ive always thought angie -who is so not shallow- could do better- but let’s see if he proves me wrong.

@ Wowoowo – He’s already proved you wrong.

African Girl @ 05/14/2013 at 2:44 pm

@annon:
.
Wow!!!! Just Lovely!!
.
Thanks!!

annon @ 05/14/2013 at 2:23 pm
Zahara is hilarious, ” Daddy, you’re not going to start making out with Mommy again, are you?” . Brangelina is so in love.

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