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Brad Pitt: 50th Birthday Today - Celebrate with 50 Hot Photos!

Brad Pitt: 50th Birthday Today - Celebrate with 50 Hot Photos!

It is officially Brad Pitt‘s 50th birthday and how else could we celebrate than with fifty of his best photos from throughout the years!?

We are taking a look back at the 50-year-old actor’s many looks throughout the years – from his bleached blonde hair to his bearded stage, and of course his sleek new look he debuted last month at the Governors Awards while supporting his fiancee Angelina Jolie.

You also will get to look back on his hottest shirtless moments and some of Brad‘s famous loves, like Juliette Lewis, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Jennifer Aniston.

Click through the slideshow below for fifty hot Brad Pitt photos…

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Photos: Getty, WENN, Wire Image, Film Magic
Posted to: Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt

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Birthday Man @ 12/18/2013 at 12:17 pm

“[Brad] has expanded my life in ways I never imagined. We built a family. He is not just the love my life, he is my family. I hold that very dear. I suppose what I’ve learned from Brad is to be able to have the kind of family whose happiness and well-being comes before your own. I’m very very grateful to have such a loving family, and I wouldn’t have that without him.”

Angelina about her love Brad Pitt

Birthday Man @ 12/18/2013 at 12:17 pm

“One of the greatest, smartest things I ever did was give my kids Angie as their mom.” Brad Pitt

W magazine ‏@wmag 8m

Happy Birthday, Brad Pitt! http://ow.ly/rRqoT pic.twitter.com/rCsPWnpMZd

Birthday Man @ 12/18/2013 at 12:18 pm

Angelina told ’60 Minutes’ in Nov. 2011, “I’m still a bad girl. I still have that side of me…it’s just in its place now… it belongs to Brad. Or … our adventures.”

“I am very lucky with Brad. He is a real gentleman, but he is also a real man’s man,” Angie told The Telegraph in May 2011. “He’s got the wonderful balance of being an extraordinary, great, loving father, a very, very intelligent man and physically he’s a real man.”

Angelina on her love Brad Pitt

CNN Entertainment ‏@CNNshowbiz now

In honor of Brad Pitt’s 50th birthday, we’re celebrating with a highlight reel of his best moments: http://cnn.it/1cALcLh

The Top 10 Movies of a Top-Heavy Year
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2013 was such a good year—at the movies, at least—that it was drawing the kinds of “best year ever” proclamations that are so symptomatic of our hyperbole-afflicted culture. But if it weren’t such a good year, I suppose it would have been called the worst year ever, so on balance, people really dug 2013.
These raves for the year’s cinematic output came around the early-fall film festival season, when the Telluride, Toronto, and New York festivals were premiering acclaimed film after acclaimed film, left and right. 12 Years a Slave was crowned the Oscar champ by Vulture. Gravity got the big critical stamp of approval before tearing up the box-office. Inside Llewyn Davis played every film festival imaginable and enchanted critic-types across an entire continent.
For me personally, the year hit the skids sometime around mid-November, with the major late-breaking releases like Saving Mr. Banks and American Hustle delivering rather sizeable disappointments, relative to my enthusiasm for them.
It’s funny to look at the New York Film Festival as a dividing line in the cinematic year, as it ended up premiering two of my favorite films in Captain Phillips and 12 Years a Slave, plus a third film, Stranger By the Lake, that’s a sure contender for my Top 10 next year once it’s been formally released in the States. (Interestingly, I first saw my #1 film of this year when it played NYFF in 2012.) The longer-lead NYFF screenings, though—the ones that were set to open in late November/December—all seemed to underwhelm in one way or another. Inside Llewyn Davis was too wrapped up in its own isolation to let any air in. Nebraska managed to pull everything together by the end, but the first hour or so was oppressively petty and unpleasant. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty was a lifeless bust entirely. All Is Lost and Her were good movies that didn’t captivate me the way they did other critics. I wonder if things would have been different had The Wolf of Wall Street premiered as the “secret screening” at NYFF like many of us expected it to. As it stands, Martin Scorsese’s celebration/condemnation/celebration of the rich and insane screened too late for me to see it in time for this list, so if you feel like there’s an asterisk that must be placed next to the subsequent ten films, you’re free to do so.
As it stands, no film in my top ten opened theatrically later than October 18, hence my calendar-based hangups. Did the final quarter of the year really underwhelm that severely for me? Ultimately, I think it’s the strength of the following films moreso than the weakness of their competitors that keeps this list so early-year dominant.
Before I get on with it already, I should throw out some Honorable Mentions to a handful of films that, were the breeze blowing a bit differently, might have snuck into that #10 slot, or higher. Films like the incredibly moving documentary about gays in Uganda, Call Me Kuchu, which was so unfortunately under-publicized and swallowed up by the bigger docs of the year (though how loudly can I possibly complain about a year that was this strong for documentaries?). Films like Nicole Holofcener’s Enough Said, which shares a spiritual place with a couple other films that did make my top ten in what was a banner year for female lead characters in indie films. Blue Is the Warmest Color and Her are two films you’ll see on many a year-end list this month, and I recommend them so highly. August: Osage County is a film you probably won’t see on as many year-end lists, but it deserves mention for a cast and a script that manage to counterbalance—and then some—some regrettably timid direction.

The Top 10 Movies of a Top-Heavy Year
———————————————–
2013 was such a good year—at the movies, at least—that it was drawing the kinds of “best year ever” proclamations that are so symptomatic of our hyperbole-afflicted culture. But if it weren’t such a good year, I suppose it would have been called the worst year ever, so on balance, people really dug 2013.
/
These raves for the year’s cinematic output came around the early-fall film festival season, when the Telluride, Toronto, and New York festivals were premiering acclaimed film after acclaimed film, left and right. 12 Years a Slave was crowned the Oscar champ by Vulture. Gravity got the big critical stamp of approval before tearing up the box-office. Inside Llewyn Davis played every film festival imaginable and enchanted critic-types across an entire continent.
.
For me personally, the year hit the skids sometime around mid-November, with the major late-breaking releases like Saving Mr. Banks and American Hustle delivering rather sizeable disappointments, relative to my enthusiasm for them.
.
It’s funny to look at the New York Film Festival as a dividing line in the cinematic year, as it ended up premiering two of my favorite films in Captain Phillips and 12 Years a Slave, plus a third film, Stranger By the Lake, that’s a sure contender for my Top 10 next year once it’s been formally released in the States. (Interestingly, I first saw my #1 film of this year when it played NYFF in 2012.) The longer-lead NYFF screenings, though—the ones that were set to open in late November/December—all seemed to underwhelm in one way or another. Inside Llewyn Davis was too wrapped up in its own isolation to let any air in. Nebraska managed to pull everything together by the end, but the first hour or so was oppressively petty and unpleasant. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty was a lifeless bust entirely. All Is Lost and Her were good movies that didn’t captivate me the way they did other critics. I wonder if things would have been different had The Wolf of Wall Street premiered as the “secret screening” at NYFF like many of us expected it to. As it stands, Martin Scorsese’s celebration/condemnation/celebration of the rich and insane screened too late for me to see it in time for this list, so if you feel like there’s an asterisk that must be placed next to the subsequent ten films, you’re free to do so.
.
As it stands, no film in my top ten opened theatrically later than October 18, hence my calendar-based hangups. Did the final quarter of the year really underwhelm that severely for me? Ultimately, I think it’s the strength of the following films moreso than the weakness of their competitors that keeps this list so early-year dominant.
Before I get on with it already, I should throw out some Honorable Mentions to a handful of films that, were the breeze blowing a bit differently, might have snuck into that #10 slot, or higher. Films like the incredibly moving documentary about gays in Uganda, Call Me Kuchu, which was so unfortunately under-publicized and swallowed up by the bigger docs of the year (though how loudly can I possibly complain about a year that was this strong for documentaries?). Films like Nicole Holofcener’s Enough Said, which shares a spiritual place with a couple other films that did make my top ten in what was a banner year for female lead characters in indie films. Blue Is the Warmest Color and Her are two films you’ll see on many a year-end list this month, and I recommend them so highly. August: Osage County is a film you probably won’t see on as many year-end lists, but it deserves mention for a cast and a script that manage to counterbalance—and then some—some regrettably timid direction.
.
The Top Ten Films of 2013

2. 12 Years a Slave
——————————–

I can leave the bigger-picture stuff to people who are far better equipped than I to speak to the significance of this movie in the greater cultural narrative about slavery. Except to say that to boil this film down to “this one finally gets it right” vs. “no film can ever get it right in this regard,” while interesting and worthy in its own respect, doesn’t entirely belong in a discussion of this film’s merits, which are plentiful. Director Steve McQueen has taken a decent amount of flak for the chilliness in his career, and there has been some talk that there’s a remove in this film as well. But by occasionally stepping back, McQueen really lets you see the ecosystem at work, how slavery depended on the compliance of corrupted people and the inaction of men who might otherwise have been good. This isn’t a faceless monolith at work, and McQueen never lets any of the component parts off the hook. But the film is also never so crass as to misbelieve that it needs to grandstand. The story speaks for itself, and it’s a terribly impactful one.

Shortcut to: http://www.thewire.com/entertainment/2013/12/top-10-movies-top-heavy-year/356276/

Fox Searchlight Re-releasing ’12 Years a Slave’ in Theaters
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December 18, 2013 | 08:05AM PT
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Oscar hopeful “12 Years a Slave” will get a big push next month when Fox Searchlight re-releases it into theaters.
The film will return in select cities beginning Jan. 17.
“We are honored to re-release this incredible film to theaters after it debuted to standing ovations in Telluride and Toronto. Steve McQueen’s deft storytelling with a superbly talented cast continues to win over audiences everywhere,” Fox Searchlight Pictures Presidents Stephen Gilula and Nancy Utley announced today.
“12 Years” was nominated for seven Golden Globes (including Best Picture), four SAG Awards and seven Spirit Awards, among others.
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Shortcut to: http://variety.com/2013/film/news/fox-searchlight-re-releasing-12-years-a-slave-in-theaters-1200972690/#

Why doesn’t get a tattoo with the name of Brangelina?

Happy Birthday Brad we share the same Birthday and the same age. We must be twins LOL! Have a wonderful one.
If you would like to get me a gift I would like money!LOL

John Singleton on Hollywood’s ‘Slavery Zeitgeist’ (Guest Column)
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9:00 AM PST 12/18/2013 by THR Staff
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The acclaimed director on how Ryan Coogler’s “Fruitvale Station,” “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” and Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave” were made outside the studio system, and what’s next for African-American movies: “The chains on what can be made and what can’t in Hollywood have been unshackled.”
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A version of this story first appeared in the Jan. 3, 2014, issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.
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By John Singleton: The director on how 2013 has changed Hollywood’s idea of commercial viability for African American-themed movies When Ryan Coogler, a newly minted USC film school grad, took his screenplay about the police killing of Oscar Grant to the Sundance Screenwriters Lab in January 2012, he had no idea what the next year would bring. Within six months, the work was in production in his native Oakland with seed money from a Chinese investor and other producers, including co-star Octavia Spencer. A year later, the picture won the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award at Sundance and went on a worldwide tour, garnering kudos at Cannes, Deauville and from the New York Film Critics Circle, the National Board of Review and the Independent Spirit Awards.
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Not bad for a movie that cost less than a million dollars. The plain truth is, Fruitvale Station was made totally outside the Hollywood studio system and every ounce of the picture feels authentic. The lives of the people involved in the movie will never be the same.
This year has seen a number of films helmed by African-American directors that raise the bar and also many questions concerning the industry’s historical outlook on what is commercial and what isn’t. In a town where many executives hold six-figure positions and are basically hired to say no ad infinitum, several projects have been made outside the system and are finding commercial and critical success.
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Legendary producer Laura Ziskin initially developed Lee Daniels’ The Butler. The picture eventually found life with a phalanx of producers and financiers that included NBA ballplayer Michael Finley; Sheila Johnson, the ex-wife of BET’s Bob Johnson; and producer Cassian Elwes. Golden Globes snubs aside, this picture will be the stuff of legend for all the success it has attained despite industry rules. What are those rules? It’s black-themed, a period film and concerns the civil rights movement — so it can’t make money. Yet the $30 million movie has grossed close to $150 million worldwide with room to grow. Whatever the awards season outcome, The Butler will have changed the landscape of the industry in a positive way.
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The clear awards frontrunner 12 Years a Slave never could have been made by a major Hollywood film studio. With all respect, it isn’t the first to have been attempted on this subject matter. Several filmmakers over time have made slavery-based projects, albeit with fewer resources, to spotty results. What makes Steve McQueen’s picture distinctive is its all-encompassing organic feel. Everything came together with this movie: the acting, by Chiwetel Ejiofor and Lupita Nyong’o, among others; writing; McQueen’s direction; Hans Zimmer’s delicate, haunting score. It will be interesting to see how the “slavery zeitgeist” created by this picture plays out in the next year. One thing is for certain: The chains on what can be made and what can’t in Hollywood have been unshackled.
.

Shortcut to: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/john-singleton-fruitvale-station-butler-666362

marieclaireuk ‏@marieclaireuk now

50 moments we wish we’d shared with Brad Pitt http://marieclai.re/mAfrKt

David Ayer – Twitter

Day 60 pic.twitter.com/wiBrKcVFa6

Wonderbust @ 12/18/2013 at 12:44 pm

Happy Birthday Brad!

WILLIAM BRADLEY PITT
Today is your special day. Celebrate with happyness . Wish you a life full of joy and love. HAPPY 50TH BIRTHDAY !

Anne ‏@Anne4Brothers now

#BradPitt 18.12.1963. Brad Pitt is someone who managed to turn focus from his looks 2 his work. A great work indeed. Congratulations

Biggest BP Long Hair Fan @ 12/18/2013 at 12:46 pm

Most beautiful man ever. Love the long hair most, especially Legends of the Fall hair. Brad call me maybe. Love you honey! This man oozes hot.

Happy Birthday to the world’s most beautiful man William Bradley Pitt. Hope you stay young and beautiful never age.

pbs.twimg.com/media/BboAKVSCYAAjquN.jpg:large

Old dude partied the night away without Jolie on Her Birthday :rotflmao: :laff: :rotflmao: Looks like he is partying his birthday away without the crypt keeper on His Birthday too. Nothing says loving like celebrating those special days without your hag baby mama or in a drunken evening with your real amours. :wink:

@Pitt:
dumbass, the pic was from last Saturday. Lol

Forbes The 10 Top Grossing Actors of 2013: Brad Pitt is
Not on the list…… Even with three movies out this year, one of which is a “tent-pole” franchise. :oops:

Pitt is a loser and will be trapped forever by his baby mama but that humanitarian award scene proved to me that he has
stop faking it for a while and wont be surprise if they break up after oscars

Happy Happy Birthday!! :color:

Happy Birthday, Bradders, where ever you are!

Happiness is over-rated” — Brad Pitt.

So i’ll just wish the ol’ goat a good birthday.

Although I am sure he’ll be celebrating this milestone, by getting drunk, and laid.

Brad’s birthday is everywhere on every possible website and blog. The power of Brad Pitt. Happy B-day babe.

Ticky hags are having a meltdown today. Lol.

@twitter:

LOL! That’s the joke of the day!

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