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Jennifer Lawrence Makes Her Annual Christmas Visit to Children's Hospital in Kentucky!

Jennifer Lawrence Makes Her Annual Christmas Visit to Children's Hospital in Kentucky!

Jennifer Lawrence makes a trip every year to visit the kids at a local children’s hospital in her hometown of Louisville, Kentucky and she made sure to go again this year!

The 26-year-old actress stopped by Norton Children’s Hospital on Christmas Eve (December 24) and brought so many smiles to the kids’ faces.

Jennifer donated $2 million to the hospital earlier this year and she also raised money for the American Heart Assocation and Jefferson County Public Schools via an early screening of her movie Passengers this week, according to Wave 3 News.

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Posted to: Jennifer Lawrence

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  • Jenny from the flop

    Publicity. She only does this when shes promoting a movie. Fake bitch

  • Li Ca Ro

    Remember that ‘shit’ that she said about what happened when she was in Hawaii filming ‘the hunger games” ?? ‘ i thought: she is going to a hospital’s children to clean her image just like she did when the nudes thing showed up’

    Nobody cares about her movie anyway…

  • AuntRosie_

    Just shows how ignorant you both are. I live in Louisville and she does this every year regardless of publicity. Find something better to do on Christmas, why don’t ya?

  • Li Ca Ro

    ‘something better to do on Christmas’?? yeah! being sad about losing a real talent like George Michael…
    She does that every year?? really?? why every time something bad about her appears she tries to show the world how good she is?? she is a fraud as an actress and people are starting to realize this…that’s why she is ‘public’ about this now and was last year, got it??

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  • http://thenewholybible.org/mark_dreher.jpg Mark Dreher

    What a nice thing to do each Christmas!

    Jennifer Lawrence has that fresh faced “girl next door”, look..

    The kind of girl, you’d be proud to bring home to your mother..

  • Julia Hjs

    Jennifer is a very good actress for her age. Also regardless of her reasons she is making a reals life contribution for the hospital. Why don’t you be kinder this Christmas and stop slagging people? What, you never made any mistakes in your life?

  • AuntRosie_

    Thank you.

  • deputy barney

    Jeez, a mixed bag of comments down here about this. Might as well throw my hat in the ring, and go to bat for Lawrence. Sort of, that is.

    After hearing how much Lawrence has changed ever since becoming famous and how arrogant she has gotten, it got me thinking about celebrities in general, and the concept of compassion.

    So, to start, how do I view Lawrence? As an actress, she is a great talent, and has the ability to eventually be remembered as one of the greats, in the league of Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, and even older passed on stars such as Judy Garland and Audrey Hepburn. Her performances in films such as The Poker House, Winter’s Bone, The Hunger Games saga (especially Catching Fire), Silver Linings Playbook, American Hustle, and even the recently released Joy and Passengers do show that she is an undeniable talent in terms of acting ability, and the more she does it, the more better she will get, and her talent is limitless in application, even though she does phone it in her second and third X-Men movies, Days of Future Past and Apocalypse. (She was best as the young idealistic Mystique in First Class).

    As a person. Well, when people say that she’s fake, I think that the word “fake” is used a bit liberally when it comes to her. After all, she has been visiting this hospital BEFORE she got famous, and she does give to charities, even going as far as to donate a whole ward to a hospital in her home town in Louisville, so I do believe that she does have a legitimate compassionate side to her. Especially when you take into account Andy Strunk, the young man with Down’s Syndrome that she befriended in Middle School, helped him win the school’s popularity contest, and stays in contact with to this day.

    On the flip side, however, she has indeed picked up some bad habits with her fame. Going out of her way to highlight her positive traits in order to cover up her bad ones (pot smoking, the nudes, Chris Martin showmance) is not good for her, and could backfire on her in the long run.

    Having said this, just trolling on message boards to continue to call her out on her hypocrisies isn’t going to help in the long run. When people become celebrities, they turn themselves into products. The problem with this is, when they fall and hit rock bottom, we as the people outside of the celebrity world have the tendency to treat them as such, for example, say if you had a dishwasher that breaks beyond repair, you get a replacement, and we treat our celebs the same way.

    That is something that I sort of have a problem with as well, since I believe that two wrongs don’t make a right, so refusing to show compassion to someone like Lawrence is just as wrong on our part as anything she has done on her part. There is an old Buddhist proverb that says “Refusing to show compassion is like drinking the poison yourself and expecting the person who wronged you to die from it.” Many of the world’s great religions and philosophies teach about compassion being something that can change lives for the better.

    For example, the great abolitionist preacher Henry Ward Beecher (born 1813, died 1887) once famously said, “Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation.” Beecher was famously tried in 1875 for an adultery charge, which was never actually proven in court, and he was ultimately exonerated later that year.

    I think that in spite of what Lawrence has done when she became famous in the negative aspects, we should still show her compassion and forgiveness in the long run. When I say that, I don’t mean, love her and forgive her and say, “Hey, it’s all right, we still love you, now keep on going with how you are right now.” What I mean is, “Hey, you did wrong, and you are suffering the consequences for it, but we will have the necessary love and compassion for you to take the steps to redeem yourself and to earn our respect back.” And speaking of respect, when it comes to showing compassion, people will refuse to show compassion because they will mistake compassion for respect, when those two ideals are very different from one another.

    If you think that is too much to think of, then consider two extreme examples (since you sometimes have to provide extreme examples in order to prove your point) back in January, I read the story of Eva Kor, a Hungarian Jewish woman who hugged and forgave SS Guard Oskar Groening even after the horrors that she and her twin sister suffered in Auschwitz, including having had illegal medical-scientific experiments performed on them, and she even went as far as to say she would have forgiven Adolf Hitler. When asked why, she said, “Why wouldn’t I forgive him?”

    The second example being, back in 2006, to give a more recent example, Charles Carl Roberts IV took a gun and shot up West Nickel Mines School, an Amish girls school in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he killed five Amish girls before turning his gun on himself. However, instead of calls of outrage and vengeance from the local Lancaster Amish community, the Amish community instead called for mourning not just for their daughters, but also for Roberts as he chose to turn his gun on himself. This was then followed by members of the Lancaster Amish community attending Roberts’ memorial service, and allowing Roberts’ family to attend the memorial service for the five girls who were taken hostage and executed.

    I just find it funny that a woman who survived one of the greatest crimes against humanity in the last century and a group of people who consciously choose to continue living in the 19th century have a better grasp on compassion and forgiveness than a lot of people on this forum.

    To sum up, yes, Lawrence has done wrong, and yes, she has picked up a lot of bad habits in the past few years, however, I would encourage anyone currently reading this to use compassion for her, and if you believe in any god of any sort, to pray for her, since its the right thing to do.

  • deputy barney

    Jeez, a mixed bag of comments down here about this. Might as well throw my hat in the ring, and go to bat for Lawrence. Sort of, that is.

    After hearing how much Lawrence has changed ever since becoming famous and how arrogant she has gotten, it got me thinking about celebrities in general, and the concept of compassion.

    So, to start, how do I view Lawrence? As an actress, she is a great talent, and has the ability to eventually be remembered as one of the greats, in the league of Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, and even older passed on stars such as Judy Garland and Audrey Hepburn. Her performances in films such as The Poker House, Winter’s Bone, The Hunger Games saga (especially Catching Fire), Silver Linings Playbook, American Hustle, and even the recently released Joy and Passengers do show that she is an undeniable talent in terms of acting ability, and the more she does it, the more better she will get, and her talent is limitless in application, even though she does phone it in her second and third X-Men movies, Days of Future Past and Apocalypse. (She was best as the young idealistic Mystique in First Class).

    As a person. Well, when people say that she’s fake, I think that the word “fake” is used a bit liberally when it comes to her. After all, she has been visiting this hospital BEFORE she got famous, and she does give to charities, even going as far as to donate a whole ward to a hospital in her home town in Louisville, so I do believe that she does have a legitimate compassionate side to her. Especially when you take into account Andy Strunk, the young man with Down’s Syndrome that she befriended in Middle School, helped him win the school’s popularity contest, and stays in contact with to this day.

    On the flip side, however, she has indeed picked up some bad habits with her fame. Going out of her way to highlight her positive traits in order to cover up her bad ones (pot smoking, the nudes, Chris Martin showmance) is not good for her, and could backfire on her in the long run.

    Having said this, just trolling on message boards to continue to call her out on her hypocrisies isn’t going to help in the long run. When people become celebrities, they turn themselves into products. The problem with this is, when they fall and hit rock bottom, we as the people outside of the celebrity world have the tendency to treat them as such, for example, say if you had a dishwasher that breaks beyond repair, you get a replacement, and we treat our celebs the same way.

    That is something that I sort of have a problem with as well, since I believe that two wrongs don’t make a right, so refusing to show compassion to someone like Lawrence is just as wrong on our part as anything she has done on her part. There is an old Buddhist proverb that says “Refusing to show compassion is like drinking the poison yourself and expecting the person who wronged you to die from it.” Many of the world’s great religions and philosophies teach about compassion being something that can change lives for the better.

    For example, the great abolitionist preacher Henry Ward Beecher (born 1813, died 1887) once famously said, “Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation.” Beecher was famously tried in 1875 for an adultery charge, which was never actually proven in court, and he was ultimately exonerated later that year.

    I think that in spite of what Lawrence has done when she became famous in the negative aspects, we should still show her compassion and forgiveness in the long run. When I say that, I don’t mean, love her and forgive her and say, “Hey, it’s all right, we still love you, now keep on going with how you are right now.” What I mean is, “Hey, you did wrong, and you are suffering the consequences for it, but we will have the necessary love and compassion for you to take the steps to redeem yourself and to earn our respect back.” And speaking of respect, when it comes to showing compassion, people will refuse to show compassion because they will mistake compassion for respect, when those two ideals are very different from one another.

    If you think that is too much to think of, then consider two extreme examples (since you sometimes have to provide extreme examples in order to prove your point) back in January, I read the story of Eva Kor, a Hungarian Jewish woman who hugged and forgave SS Guard Oskar Groening even after the horrors that she and her twin sister suffered in Auschwitz, including having had illegal medical-scientific experiments performed on them, and she even went as far as to say she would have forgiven Adolf Hitler. When asked why, she said, “Why wouldn’t I forgive him?”

    The second example being, back in 2006, to give a more recent example, Charles Carl Roberts IV took a gun and shot up West Nickel Mines School, an Amish girls school in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he killed five Amish girls before turning his gun on himself. However, instead of calls of outrage and vengeance from the local Lancaster Amish community, the Amish community instead called for mourning not just for their daughters, but also for Roberts as he chose to turn his gun on himself. This was then followed by members of the Lancaster Amish community attending Roberts’ memorial service, and allowing Roberts’ family to attend the memorial service for the five girls who were taken hostage and executed.

    I just find it funny that a woman who survived one of the greatest crimes against humanity in the last century and a group of people who consciously choose to continue living in the 19th century have a better grasp on compassion and forgiveness than a lot of people on this forum.

    To sum up, yes, Lawrence has done wrong, and yes, she has picked up a lot of bad habits in the past few years, however, I would encourage anyone currently reading this to use compassion for her, and if you believe in any god of any sort, to pray for her, since its the right thing to do.

  • deputy barney

    Jeez, a mixed bag of comments down here about this. Might as well throw my hat in the ring, and go to bat for Lawrence. Sort of, that is.

    After hearing how much Lawrence has changed ever since becoming famous and how arrogant she has gotten, it got me thinking about celebrities in general, and the concept of compassion.

    So, to start, how do I view Lawrence? As an actress, she is a great talent, and has the ability to eventually be remembered as one of the greats, in the league of Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, and even older passed on stars such as Judy Garland and Audrey Hepburn. Her performances in films such as The Poker House, Winter’s Bone, The Hunger Games saga (especially Catching Fire), Silver Linings Playbook, American Hustle, and even the recently released Joy and Passengers do show that she is an undeniable talent in terms of acting ability, and the more she does it, the more better she will get, and her talent is limitless in application, even though she does phone it in her second and third X-Men movies, Days of Future Past and Apocalypse. (She was best as the young idealistic Mystique in First Class).

    As a person. Well, when people say that she’s fake, I think that the word “fake” is used a bit liberally when it comes to her. After all, she has been visiting this hospital BEFORE she got famous, and she does give to charities, even going as far as to donate a whole ward to a hospital in her home town in Louisville, so I do believe that she does have a legitimate compassionate side to her. Especially when you take into account Andy Strunk, the young man with Down’s Syndrome that she befriended in Middle School, helped him win the school’s popularity contest, and stays in contact with to this day.

    On the flip side, however, she has indeed picked up some bad habits with her fame. Going out of her way to highlight her positive traits in order to cover up her bad ones (pot smoking, the nudes, Chris Martin showmance) is not good for her, and could backfire on her in the long run.

    Having said this, just trolling on message boards to continue to call her out on her hypocrisies isn’t going to help in the long run. When people become celebrities, they turn themselves into products. The problem with this is, when they fall and hit rock bottom, we as the people outside of the celebrity world have the tendency to treat them as such, for example, say if you had a dishwasher that breaks beyond repair, you get a replacement, and we treat our celebs the same way.

    That is something that I sort of have a problem with as well, since I believe that two wrongs don’t make a right, so refusing to show compassion to someone like Lawrence is just as wrong on our part as anything she has done on her part. There is an old Buddhist proverb that says “Refusing to show compassion is like drinking the poison yourself and expecting the person who wronged you to die from it.” Many of the world’s great religions and philosophies teach about compassion being something that can change lives for the better.

    For example, the great abolitionist preacher Henry Ward Beecher (born 1813, died 1887) once famously said, “Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation.” Beecher was famously tried in 1875 for an adultery charge, which was never actually proven in court, and he was ultimately exonerated later that year.

    I think that in spite of what Lawrence has done when she became famous in the negative aspects, we should still show her compassion and forgiveness in the long run. When I say that, I don’t mean, love her and forgive her and say, “Hey, it’s all right, we still love you, now keep on going with how you are right now.” What I mean is, “Hey, you did wrong, and you are suffering the consequences for it, but we will have the necessary love and compassion for you to take the steps to redeem yourself and to earn our respect back.” And speaking of respect, when it comes to showing compassion, people will refuse to show compassion because they will mistake compassion for respect, when those two ideals are very different from one another.

    If you think that is too much to think of, then consider two extreme examples (since you sometimes have to provide extreme examples in order to prove your point) back in January, I read the story of Eva Kor, a Hungarian Jewish woman who hugged and forgave SS Guard Oskar Groening even after the horrors that she and her twin sister suffered in Auschwitz, including having had illegal medical-scientific experiments performed on them, and she even went as far as to say she would have forgiven Adolf Hitler. When asked why, she said, “Why wouldn’t I forgive him?”

    The second example being, back in 2006, to give a more recent example, Charles Carl Roberts IV took a gun and shot up West Nickel Mines School, an Amish girls school in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he killed five Amish girls before turning his gun on himself. However, instead of calls of outrage and vengeance from the local Lancaster Amish community, the Amish community instead called for mourning not just for their daughters, but also for Roberts as he chose to turn his gun on himself. This was then followed by members of the Lancaster Amish community attending Roberts’ memorial service, and allowing Roberts’ family to attend the memorial service for the five girls who were taken hostage and executed.

    I just find it funny that a woman who survived one of the greatest crimes against humanity in the last century and a group of people who consciously choose to continue living in the 19th century have a better grasp on compassion and forgiveness than a lot of people on this forum.

    To sum up, yes, Lawrence has done wrong, and yes, she has picked up a lot of bad habits in the past few years, however, I would encourage anyone currently reading this to use compassion for her, and if you believe in any god of any sort, to pray for her, since its the right thing to do.

  • Jenny from the flop

    she’s so fake

  • Sprite

    A little bit of merriment and a bright Donatello, you want nothing more than to see everyone healthy.
    What their looking for is Microbes to solve problems, possibly part of Nano-technology.
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/television/alan-alda-muses-on-mash-movie-making-and-microbes/article1319743/
    http://www.worldsciencefestival.com.au/

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