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Brad Pitt Calls Angelina Jolie 'Brave' After Her Mastectomy

Brad Pitt Calls Angelina Jolie 'Brave' After Her Mastectomy

Brad Pitt has made his first public statement since news of his fiancee Angelina Jolie‘s cancer-preventative double mastectomy has spread across the Internet.

“Having witnessed this decision firsthand, I find Angie‘s choice, as well as so many others like her, absolutely heroic,” the 49-year-old actor told JustJared.com. “I thank our medical team for their care and focus. All I want for is for her to have a long and healthy life, with myself and our children. This is a happy day for our family.”

In case you missed it, check out Angelina‘s op-ed story about the process, which she wrote for the New York Times.

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264 Responses to “Brad Pitt Calls Angelina Jolie 'Brave' After Her Mastectomy”

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  1. 26
    teri Says:

    So much love for this family. Brad truly loves Angelina, wishing them a happy and healthy life together.

  2. 27
    Rocky Says:

    @Anna:

    Do you have a man? If you do, then he must be the type that WOULD leave a woman like you! Gee, wonder why????

  3. 28
    Patti Says:

    @Anna: You really are a little crazy little troll. So Jolie is making this all up to keep Brad – maybe in your world that would happen but not in the world the rest of us live in.

  4. 29
    anustin Says:

    yes,brad,eh.healthy life for u and ur children.sweet!

  5. 30
    happyness Says:

    If she was brave she wouldn’t be scared of death and I’m not wishing anything to anyone.

  6. 31
    Patti Says:

    @nice: What she has done is given publicity to the situation – it does not disrespect other women who have undergone the same thing. In the UK after a popular C list celeb was very public about her losing battle against cervical cancer testing went up 300% and numerous cancers were caught early. Other Celebs going public have raised awareness of certain diseases and types of cancers. Just because you do not like Jolie do not ignore the message.

  7. 32
    lurker Says:

    This is not the time to reply or talk to trolls,they do not matter today

  8. 33
    Passing Through Says:

    # 2 Alexanderina @ 05/14/2013 at 11:30 am
    .
    Hi Alexanderina! Long time no see. It’s sad reason to post but glad to see you here.

  9. 34
    Passing Through Says:

    # 229 Sherry (not from JPW) @ 05/14/2013 at 9:09
    .
    I’m sure Lamey has turned Angie’s revelation into her usual conspiracy\PR motives. Let me guess – Angie is the best at controlling her “brand” and she’s only making the announcment now because WWZ has a lot of bad chatter from nitwits like her and the trolls. When the reality is Angie probably made the announcement now because the tabloids are always snooping around for info on her and they’d have found out about it sooner or later. Why shouldn’t she be the one to announce it how and when she wants? Ift’s body, her life and her family that’s most affected. She sure as hell wasn’t worried about what some pissy little Canadian blogger who can develop a conspiracy theory out of little more than an empty serial bowl sitting on Angie’s dining room table. Lamey nees to STFU on this subject. She wouldn’t write about Marcheline’s death, didn’t write about Christina Applegate of that Rancic chick but because it’s Angie she’s going to write about bad news that she swore she’d never cover. Two-faced, wonky-eyed beeyatch.

  10. 35
    Joam Says:

    whether a very courageous and difficult decision, Brave girl!!!

  11. 36
    lylian Says:

    @Passing Through:
    .
    >>>>>>>>
    .
    hahahaha! You were right about Lainey and her conspiracy theory.
    .
    also, about snooping – It is amazing that they had managed to keep the information private for as long as they have. An operation like this involves many people, several doctors and nurses. I dunno how they did it.

  12. 37
    lurker Says:

    Ms. Jolie is a heroine to many. Me included. There are very few public figures who do it all, put their money where their mouth is, suit up and show up and, as Eleanor Roosevelt said, “do the thing you think you cannot do.” She is brave and bold and challenging. She challenges the world with her thoughts and actions and deeds. She tells stories that have meaning. She walks the walk, talks the talk and does so with jaw dropping beauty and admirable and seemingly effortless style.

    She is, as we say, a good egg.

    Today’s revelation, done with eloquence and dignity and grace, is remarkable both in its message and its import to the world of women. Pro-action.

    What also struck me this morning was her ability — in this TMZ’d world where every illness, struggle, step and misstep a public person makes is deemed newsworthy and fodder for the tabloid machine — to do this in private. Surrounded by people she had to trust with this most delicate and sensitive of issues, she did it in the safety net of family and doctors and nurses and technicians who stuck with their original command: first, do no harm.

    They respected Ms. Jolie with her privacy and in doing so allowed her to share, if and when she wanted to, her journey with the public. The separation between church and state, public and private allows the millions of women who will follow her lead to listen and watch her now that she has recovered and not stare at a grainy image of perhaps a very frail and post operative Jolie, in the private sanctuary of her medical team.

    I add this to the long list of admirable qualities she possesses and I only hope, if I have to navigate any illness or issue, that I will try to emulate Ms. Jolie as my guide and follow in her very strong and brave steps and her quiet dignity.

    This Blogger’s Books from

    Is There Really a Human Race?
    by Jamie Lee Curtis

  13. 38
    lurker Says:

    i Feel like kicking lainey’s ass what a fuc*ing moron

  14. 39
    MrsT Says:

    She is brave because she made a difficult choice that others wouldn’t or couldn’t and Brad’s love and support are an important part of her recovery. God bless the Jolie-Pitts!

  15. 40
    thelookoflove1365 Says:

    So very proud of Angie. Wishing her the best of health.

  16. 41
    Pinkrose Says:

    Well said Jamie Lee Curtis. Angie watched her mother suffer with ovarian cancer for ten years and Brad for about three years. She beat it once and it reappeared years later. I am sure she did not wish her children to go through that agony of watching her die over a period of many years.

    Of course, there is always another illness that could take her out, but this one she knew about and could do something preventative.

    Finally, I feel sorry for people who can go on a board and spill venom day after day. YOU DON’T HAVE TO LOVE OTHERS, BUT YOU CERTAINLY DON’T HAVE TO HATE. Go read a book or listen to some music.

  17. 42
    @Ina_Angel Says:

    That’s one threat down… parents really will do anything to be around their kids for as long as possible! BRAVE!

  18. 43
    Kimmie Says:

    @Anna: and you know that for certain?

  19. 44
    lylian Says:

    @MrsT:
    .
    >>>>>>>>>
    .
    She’s also brave because she chose to share this information in a world where many would love to tear her down. So here she is, a sex symbol, who no longer possesses the breasts she was born with – those important symbols of her sex and sexuality.
    .
    All in the hope that:
    .
    (a) some women at least will get more information about the BRCA genetic defect or seek more information about the options available and perhaps save some lives; and
    .
    (b) some women are comforted that they are not alone in undertaking this highly invasive operation.
    .
    The great news is, she’s achieved her purpose of releasing this news. Many posters expressed greater courage and determination to confront their fears of genetic testing and several talked about feeling much more comforted to know that they were not alone in undertaking this highly invasive procedure.

  20. 45
    Passing Through Says:

    # 250 lylian @ 05/14/2013 at 10:27 am
    .
    I find myself in a conundrum:
    .
    Is wishing for JHo to marry gigolo wishing her well or not?
    .
    LOL!
    .
    ++++++++++++++++++++++
    .
    Dang…good point. I’m going to say this doesn’t qualify for the kind of “ill” I was talking about, ie, sickness, loss of limb or life, etc. Wanting her to marry Sqiggy is, admittedly, selfish because it provides me with endless amusement. I’m sure that’s not their intent but that’s their problem, not mine. At the moment I’m watching Squiggy’s Batman-shaped hairline recede further and further back. I’ve been debating whether or not he’ll get it reseeded for the wedding that’s not happening…

  21. 46
    Phool Says:

    Angelina Jolie has done something extraordinary
    In publicly discussing her double mastectomy, the actor has challenged the celebrity industry to rethink its bizarre values – and she has done all women a huge service

    ========================

    Credit Gauardian UK

    -

    Of course, Angelina Jolie is not the first actress to have had a mastectomy, that most medical of terms referring to the removal of at least one of the anatomical attributes that actresses are expected to hoik up for the sake of their career. In fact, off the top of my head, I can name four: Christina Applegate, Olivia Newton John, Lynn Redgrave and Kathy Bates have all publicly discussed their mastectomies.

    Nor is she the first to have a preventive double mastectomy: Sharon Osbourne (not an actress but very much a woman in the public eye) announced only last year that she had one after discovering, as she told Hello! magazine, that she had “the breast-cancer gene”.

    Yet while Jolie may not be the first, she has done something that is – by any standards – pretty extraordinary and brave, even on top of having a preventive double mastectomy. She is certainly the highest-profile woman to make such an announcement in a long time, and she is arguably one with the most at stake. For a young, beautiful actress to announce that she has had her breasts removed is, as career moves go, somewhat akin to a handsome leading man announcing he is gay, and that is disgusting and ridiculous on both counts. Ultimately, she has challenged not just her own public image but also the wearisome cliche of what makes a woman sexy, and how a woman considered to be sexy talks about her body.

    Judging from her clear, calm and plain-speaking article in the New York Times discussing why she elected to undergo a double mastectomy, Jolie views publicising her decision as simply a matter of public service:

    “I chose not to keep my story private because there are many women who do not know that they might be living under the shadow of cancer. It is my hope that they, too, will be able to get gene tested, and that if they have a high risk they, too, will know they have strong options,” she writes, while acknowledging the issues of financial access that prevent too many women from getting tested and treated.

    Jolie is by now surely used to having certain parts of her body scrutinised by the media – more than most other female celebrities, in fact, and that is truly saying something. Her body shape is often watched for signs of an incipient eating disorder. Her leg got its own Twitter feed after the 2012 Academy Awards. The most personal elements of her life have long been part of the pop-cultural discourse, from her troubled relationship with her difficult father, to her children, to her marriages, to the eternal hoo-hah over the Aniston-Pitt-Jolie triangle that, one suspects, has fascinated the tabloids far longer than it has the participants.

    Yet Jolie herself has always maintained the kind of personal privacy that now only the most A-list of actresses can afford. She rarely gives interviews and she doesn’t pose next to naked on the cover of men’s magazines. Even as Lara Croft, her most obviously sexy role, she generally wore a bodysuit as opposed to a bikini. For a woman who has routinely won in those most crucial of elections – the Sexiest Woman in the World – Jolie has, really, never shown much interest in sharing herself or her body with the public. This makes her decision to do so now in the most personal of ways more powerful, but also, to a certain degree, more understandable.

    For almost a decade now, she has been very determinedly trying to move away from the kind of sexualised films that made her famous, such as Tomb Raider and the eminently forgettable Original Sin with Antonio Banderas, in favour of movies such as A Mighty Heart and Changeling, in which she played, respectively, a grief-struck widow and a grief-struck mother, arguably at the cost of her career. For all her much-vaunted sexiness, Jolie has not relied on her body for acting roles for a long time (and at times, it has looked like she wasn’t even that interested in acting, full stop, preferring instead to focus on her UN work and motherhood). As such, for her then to announce how she has altered it is not quite as potentially career-altering for her as it would be for those who have been led to believe that their breasts are the only currency they have to offer.

    Jolie ends her New York Times article discussing the “challenges” of life, but this is a rare instance of her opting for euphemisms. In earlier paragraphs, with the kind of forthrightness one rarely sees from any member of the entertainment industry, she proffers descriptions of her “nipple delay”, the removal of her breast tissue, temporary fillers, expanders, tubes, blood, scarring and bruising. “I do not feel any less of a woman,” she writes. “I feel empowered that I made a strong choice that in no way diminishes my femininity.”

    That breasts do not exist just to turn on other people will not come as a surprise to any sentient adult human being. Nor, it should go without saying but sadly does not, do breasts make the woman. But brutal, mature reality does not generally have much of a place in the fantasy land where the myths of celebrities and public perception intermix. In fact, in this fantasy land of celebrity puffery and tabloid nonsense, Angelina Jolie was, only 24 hours ago, still, in the eyes of the media, the sex-crazed, blood-drinking, man-stealing seductress (albeit one with six children) that she has been pretty much since she came to the public eye decades ago. In fact, only last weekend I read an article – and I’m using that term in the loosest sense – claiming that Jolie was so adamant to have her wedding before Jennifer Aniston’s that she and Brad Pitt had already booked a “romantic getaway honeymoon” for themselves. Now we know that, contrary to looking up “sexxxxxy hotels” on the internet while having mind-blowing sexy sex, Pitt and Jolie have actually been otherwise engaged at the Pink Lotus Breast Center, while Jolie was being treated for her double mastectomy. Rarely has the disjunct between celebrity gossip rubbish and the actual truth looked so ridiculously exposed.

    Earlier this week, Bret Easton Ellis also wrote a powerful, albeit very different, piece in Out magazine about how gay figures in the public eye are expected to be saintly: “Being ‘real’ and ‘human’ (ie flawed) is not necessarily what The Gay Gatekeepers want straight culture to see,” he wrote.

    One could make a similar argument about how beautiful young women are presented in the press: they are expected to be perfectly proportioned, always photogenic and with all conventionally sexy attributes in their proper place. But part of being a “real” and “human” woman is facing the possibility of breast cancer and dealing with it accordingly.

    Not long ago, public discussions of mastectomies at all were taboo (it was – and let us all pay our respects here – Betty Ford who started the fightback against this when she discussed hers openly in 1974). But the truth is that Jolie – and Applegate, Redgrave, and the rest of the public few – are merely the tip of a pragmatic iceberg as there are plenty of other high-profile women – women whose “bikini bodies” are probably being discussed in celebrity magazines today – who have endured similar operations. But they have decided – for the sake of their careers, for the sake of their mental wellbeing – to keep the fact hidden from the press.

    And, really, who can blame them? What woman would want to be asked about their mastectomy in every interview they give for their rest of their lives? What woman could endure knowing that every time they are photographed – on a red carpet, in a film, papped on a beach – that strangers around the world are scrutinising their body to see whether and how much their chest has changed? A mastectomy involves more than enough pain – both emotional and physical – without even beginning to think about the prurient and ghoulish interest of millions.

    When it comes to celebrities, cynicism is generally the instinctive response. But for Jolie to take all that on, at no benefit to her but simply to draw attention to the illness and ways it can be prevented and treated, should only be applauded. For the celebrity world to begin to grow up and treat its women as adults as opposed to sex objects is still the hope. And for the cost of testing and treatment to get more funding worldwide, thus allowing more women’s lives to be saved, is still the ideal.

  22. 47
    thelookoflove1365 Says:

    Geez, We all know that trolls are stuupid & heartless but man oh man, their lives must be so unbearable to carry that hate day in & day out. They are the ones who suffer from cancer…cancer of the hear-. So black & venomous, & uncaring.
    .
    As for Lamey, if she’s saying stuupid sh*t again & conspiracy BS, well I will not go there and give her hits, but dammn that woman is so off the grid, way out there with her conspiracy BS that even the most paranoid CIA agent will laugh at her BS.

  23. 48
    AWHODAT! Says:

    I havnt visites that laimeyfvkkker site but i’ve seen what lylian and PT said upthread and i’m not surprised. You know what tho, we should all bring pressure to bear on that yellow-bellied b!tch to open up her blog to comments, if she’s so proud of her work and welcomes public feedback. Consider: if youre an artist….a professional…..a producer of a good or service for public consumption, dont you wish to know how those who consume your product feel and think about it? Unless, of course, youre a fvkkking stinking yellow coward like this laimeysh!teater..

  24. 49
    plez Says:

    @lurker: The sad part is that she has young female readers and she did a disservice to them with her remarks. Rather than taking this as a serious matter, she just included it as another one of her tabloid conspiracy theories.

  25. 50
    Phool Says:

    Why Angelina Jolie’s Double Mastectomy Resonates With So Many Women
    ====================================

    Angelina Jolie’s personal account of being told she has a fault in her BRCA1 gene and decision to have a double mastectomy to reduce the risk of her developing breast cancer has struck a chord with many individuals and families.

    In her account in the New York Times she says she was told by her doctors that the fault in her BRCA1 gene raised her own individual chances of developing breast cancer to 87%.

    Angelina describes her decision to undergo risk reducing surgery after her mother died from breast cancer aged 56.

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the UK affecting around 55,000 women every year. The vast majority of breast cancers happen by chance but a small number of people diagnosed with breast cancer (less than 10%) have inherited a fault in one of the known breast cancer genes; BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53 which means they will have a much higher chance of developing the disease over the general population.

    Most breast cancers are not due to inherited (genetic) factors and do not affect the lifetime risk for other relatives. So, even if you have a relative with breast cancer, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re more likely to get it yourself.

    However a small number of people may have an increased risk of developing breast cancer because of a significant family history. A family history looks at the past and present illnesses of your blood relatives (those related to you by birth, not marriage) over several generations.

    If you’re concerned about your risk of developing breast cancer it’s important that you get professional advice tailored to you and your family. Your GP (local doctor) is a good place to start.

    Breast Cancer Care talks to many who may be concerned about a possible family history, either themselves or for others and we have plenty of support on offer for those looking for it. Our breast cancer in families booklet explains what a diagnosis of breast cancer in your family may mean for you. The Breast Cancer Care Helpline (0808 800 6000) can also offer information and support for anyone concerned about breast cancer.

    Being told you have an increased risk of developing breast cancer because of an inherited genetic fault or significant family history can be an anxious time. Making decisions about managing your risk either by earlier screening or risk reducing surgeries can be difficult. Talking to someone who understands how you feel can help.

    Breast Cancer Care can put you in touch with someone who has been through a similar situation and has been trained to offer support. Find out more about one to one support.

    Commenting on the story Dr Emma Pennery, Breast Cancer Care’s Clinical Director said:

    “Angelina’s experience will resonate with the many women we support each day.

    “We welcome Angelina’s comments which highlight this important issue and encourage women in a similar situation to find support. It’s important that anyone who has inherited a faulty BRCA gene is able to make an informed decision about risk-reducing surgery and other options available to them. It is positive that Angelina feels surgery has not reduced her femininity, though we know that people’s experiences of surgery will vary.

    “Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK. So even if a relative has the disease it doesn’t necessarily mean that you are more likely to get breast cancer. Fewer than 10% of all breast cancers are caused by faulty breast cancer genes; the two most commonly linked to hereditary breast cancer are BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    “If you’re concerned about your risk, talk to a healthcare professional – this could be your GP or if you have breast cancer, your breast care team.”

    -Credit Huffington Post UK

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