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Brad Pitt Sports Space Suit on 'Ad Astra' Movie Set!

Brad Pitt Sports Space Suit on 'Ad Astra' Movie Set!

Brad Pitt is back to work on his upcoming film Ad Astra!

The 53-year-old actor was spotted wearing a space suit while on the film’s set on Friday (September 29) in Baker, Calif.

The science fiction thriller is about “one man’s journey across a lawless and unforgiving solar system to find his missing father, a renegade scientist who poses a threat to all of mankind,” according to THR.

Ruth Negga recently joined the cast of the film, which also includes Tommy Lee Jones.

Ad Astra is set to hit theaters on January 11, 2019.

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Photos: Backgrid
Posted to: Brad Pitt

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  • toastie postie

    Dumpster won’t mention this guy as a hero – unarmed and drew fire away from concert goers before swat team and police arrived

    RogelioGarcia Lawyer‏ @LawyerRogelio
    MEXICAN AMERICAN JESUS CAMPOS Unarmed Security Guard Took On Las Vegas Killer Stephen Paddock http://thebea.st/2y1yfQv?source=twitter&via=desktop … via @thedailybeast
    https://twitter.com/LawyerRogelio/status/915717493611810816

  • toastie postie

    😝😝😝

  • Passing Through

    Oh snap! Elizabeth Warren is “persisting” again. This time it’s it’s the Equifax CEO in front of the Senate hearing on it’s hacking that saw 145MIL credit records stolen. As she points out – this is the 4th time they’ve been hacked since 2013 and despite being warned about a security hole just months before the hack – they did NOTHING to fix it. Then she points out how Equifax is making a shiteload of money off of all these hacks. Their profits are up something 80% in the last 4 years from selling credit protection to people who are victims of their deliberate failure to fix security holes in their system. Even worse – if you buy your credit protection through LifeLock? Guess who LifeLock pays to secure your info? Yep – Equifax. As Warrent points out – every time there’s a hack like this Equifax gives customers 1 year of free credit monitoring but after 1 year if they want to keep it, they have to pay for it or buy LifeLock. Either way – Equifax gets paid and consumers get screwed. They give you 1 year of monitor for free – but you have to deal with identity theft for the rest of year life. Take my word for this! She’s also right in that consumers should be able to determine who has access to their data and NOT the credit monitoring companies. So Equifax doesn’t plug a security hole that would have cost them $2 per record to fix – and now after 1 year of free credit monitor consumers will have to pay them $17/mo to continue having them monitor their credit. She’s also right that every time they pull this stunt they should be held personally responsible for all the money the credit card companies have to write off in fake purchases and to issue new credit cards. More greedy basters – just like Well Fargo.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWsnAmhUoHE

  • Angela Johnson

    Her face has been all over the news like she was involved. I would be furious if the media was putting my face everywhere.

  • Angela Johnson

    Brad looks good.

  • plez

    Now if the voters really wanted to change things up we should have voted for Warren to be president. But we all know if they couldn’t handle Clinton being tough they certainly would not have been able to handle Warren.

    Heard about what Wells Fargo did on the news tonight. Just shows if you don’t penalize or threaten these CEOs with jail time, they just keep doing the same thing. Hopefully the gov’t is watching the banks re mortgages.

    Lastly who let that goof ball sitting behind the president of Equifax.

  • Beedyq

    It looks possible to me that maybe Brad has a new tatt near his neck area??? Pics are so out of focus taken with long range zoom camera lenses so just guessing at what I might be seeing LOL.

    http://www.justjared.com/photo-gallery/3968183/brad-pitt-on-ad-astra-set-06/

  • toastie postie

    Thanks!

  • toastie postie

    I know! “Monopoly Man” – wonder if someone set him there to try to distract her?

  • Passing Through

    This cracks me up – Ivanka and Uday…narrowly avoided prosecution for trying to defraud people in an a real estate deal. Bu-bu-but she’s The Good Trump Who Has Morals, right? Rotten apples and trees, folks. Be sure to check out the part where they said there were emails between Ivanka and Uday coordinating false info to give to buyers and later saying they were afraid a journalist may be on to them. Of course Drump’s personal lawyer intervened and got them off the hook. BUT…she’s The Good Trump With Morals who gives Drumpf a conscience, right? Snort.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xdzu2QJOVrM#t=144.371611

  • toastie postie

    That makes me so sick. Corrupt DA in my opinion.

  • Passing Through

    The ReThug Senators would shite a brick if Elizabeth Warren was elected president. She’d be calling bullshite on them night and day. What would be interesting though is to see how Bernie Sanders would hadn’t running opposite her because they’re friends. Would he pull the same stuff on her he did with HRC?

    Re: Well Fargo – I posted a video last night of Warren going after the CEO at a Banking Committee hearing the other day. She was all over that greedy bastard, too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mD2pMXmnH4A

  • Passing Through

    Yep. He gave back a donation before he investigated them…but he took the money in the first place while rumors where floating that they were pulling this scam.

  • Passing Through

    Where at? Are you talking about just below his chin on the left – or above his t-shirt on the right? Just looks like pixelation from enlarging shitty photos to me…

  • Felinelilly

    Good to see Mr. Pitt! You know it’s bad when you see the TYAS commercial on tv and start grinning like an idiot when his face is shown on screen, I really missed seeing him. lol Mr. Stealth has been stealth.
    I don’t really like the slimmer look on him, but it’s for the movie so… I love his hair though.

  • toastie postie

    😠😠😠

  • Beedyq

    No one in that drumpfie family has a single scintilla of what constitutes any morality, they are all slimy sewage that oozed out of a garbage landfill.

  • Felinelilly

    No wonder they’re two peas in a pod, she’s exactly like him.

  • Beedyq

    Yes right above his t-shirt on the right.

    You are probably right about the pixilation.

    Obviously the pap took poor quality pics from a distance.

  • Passing Through

    Just makes you realize how she’s used her looks her whole life to hide her evil side. Personally I think think she’s all that beautiful, but some people think she is – and of course she’s blond (whether it’s natural or not) so that helps her get away with that whole “innocent/who me?” shtick. it also makes you wonder exactly how culpable she is in some of her husband’s shady business and failures to disclose info.

  • Lylian

    Ivanka and uday may not be out of the woods yet. Civil suits possible now. Not sure if criminal prosecution can be restarted. Not sure if there is a time limit for these sorts of criminal actions.

    Can NY AG put pressure on Ivanka and uday to help mueller?

  • Lylian

    Yep

  • Felinelilly

    I don’t think she’s that beautiful either, even after her plastic surgeries. And add her foul ethics and greed and her being a crook just like her daddy dearest, and I think she’s one of the ugliest women inside and out.
    Oh you know she’s in deep with her baby Satan (thanks LV!) husband and all his shady dealings. She can play dumb blonde if she likes but there’s no way she can’t know. Lying and shady business dealings are probably foreplay to them.

  • Lesley Starkey

    Great interview with Angie and Loung in the Santa Barbara Independent:

    Thursday, October 5, 2017

    By Josef Woodard

    Never mind the nattering scuttlebutting and the tabloid “fake news” cycles concerning Angelina Jolie at the moment. What matters now in the famed actress/director/producer’s life is the fact that she has just expanded her impressive filmography as a director, following In the Land of Blood and Honey, Unbroken, and By the Sea, by one, with the engrossing and important new Netflix film First They Killed My Father. What she has wrought is one of the most affecting and, by nature, harrowing — yet also beautiful — cinematic accounts of the Khmer Rouge’s reign of genocidal terror during the 1970s, during which an estimated quarter of the nation’s population of seven million was killed.

    It’s a personal project on various levels. Jolie first traveled to Cambodia in 2000, while filming Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001), and fell in love with the country, its culture, and its people. She ended up adopting her eldest son, Maddox, a Cambodian orphan. Around the same time, she met her friend, the author Loung Ung, whose book — about her own experience as a child, from 1975 to ’78, during the Khmer Rouge atrocities — is the basis of the new film.

    The pair wrote the screenplay together, and eventually marshalled the resources to create the film in the country and in its native Khmer language, with the help of respected Cambodian filmmaker Rithy Panh. Among the movie’s numerous points of distinction is a remarkable, poised performance of Loung as a young girl, by Sreymoch Sareum, and captivating visuals from cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle that capture the resplendent natural beauty of a country that has also known the depths of tragedy.

    Presently, the film can be streamed on Netflix, and it has had theatrical runs in select markets. It deserves big-screen and Oscar consideration — having been chosen as Cambodia’s Academy Awards nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.

    Jolie and Ung were in Santa Barbara recently, to speak after a screening of the film via the Cinema Society program of the Santa Barbara International Film Festival (SBIFF), with a post-movie Q&A by SBIFF head Roger Durling. During the screening, the pair sat down for an interview with the Santa Barbara Independent over lunch in their bungalow at the El Encanto, where the stunning ocean view and ample creature comforts seemed a world away from the horrors portrayed on the screen.

    You have created a very powerful film. I knew about the Khmer Rouge tragedy, but you dealt with it in such a subtle way. With war films, there is the temptation to resort to explicit and excessive violence, but you don’t go that route. Was that a conscious decision?

    Angelina Jolie (AJ): Well, as much as it was about coming to terms with history and making sure that the country that doesn’t often speak about these issues speaks about it, and that young people are educated about the horrors, equally, it was about Cambodian family, culture, love. That’s what should always live on, beyond war.

    Loung Ung (LU): As a survivor and a writer, it was important for me to tell the story of the love that you hold on to, the love that helps you survive. I never wanted to write a book about war. I wanted to write about what it takes to survive a war, to honor my family … I keep a journal. I’ve been writing for a long time. When I started thinking about publishing my work, after Pol Pot died in 1998, in one of his interviews, he said he did what he did “for love.” I wanted to negate that policy. Love does not a genocide make. Love does not result in 1.7-2 million Cambodians dead. I wanted to tell a story of what love looks like, with a father, a mother, brothers and sisters, and survival and grace and joy and faith. That’s how I wrote my book.

    Loung, you lived through this story. What was it like the first time you saw the finished film on a big screen? Was that a particularly emotional event?[/b]

    LU: It was. I had incredible gratitude. Outside of the immediate sadness and anger, the spirituality of the film touched me. The opening scene of the family sitting down together for dinner may seem very ordinary for many people. But for me, it was almost as if my family had come back to life. I don’t have that image of my family in that way. And to see them alive and happy and eating a meal together was something very beautiful. That completely tore me apart, because you miss it.

    Apart from The Killing Fields, the astonishing story of the Khmer Rouge hasn’t entered the realm of film very often. Has the subject been dealt with much in Cambodian film?

    AJ: Rithy (Panh), our producer, has [dealt with it]. He makes extraordinary documentaries. Things had to come together for the country to come together, to be able to deal with it, in the right time and the right place. It was important to make this in-country. The Killing Fields was shot in the Philippines, and it was in English. I loved The Killing Fields. It’s one of my favorite movies. But it didn’t bring me as close as I wanted.

    [Loung’s] book brought me inside a family and brought me inside Cambodia …. Nothing of this size has been shot in this country, or in the language of Khmer. I believe very strongly in languages and am concerned about languages disappearing. It’s very important that films are made in foreign languages, for that country. I understand the idea of adjusting for the masses, on occasion. But it’s equally important to do it as it is, and as it truly speaks to the people in their tongue.

    What about how this film will play out with a general public? There is that fear of reading among a general moviegoing public.

    AJ: I’m hoping that people give it a chance. It’s also not packed full of dialogue, so you’re not spending a lot of time [reading]. It’s interesting how you can put a subtitle over a moment and an image, and it becomes something even stronger, when you see certain words and a certain face. In this particular film, it was important where the words would come in and how they’d land, which could become part of the experience and not something where you’re competing with the screen.

    It’s wonderful that Netflix has put this out to so many different countries, in a way that’s accessible to younger people. A lot of people who stream TV shows maybe are not as much in the habit of watching foreign films. I hope that this will expand the viewing of foreign films, to a different audience, in a new way.

    Loung, there are some key scenes in the film, and I wondered how true they were to your own experience, or if it was creative, cinematic license at work. I’m thinking of the powerful landmine scene. Was there a situation where you found yourself in a field of landmines?

    LU: I worked on the landmines campaign for 10 years, in America. I certainly had experiences walking alone where there were landmines, and have known people blown up by landmines. I remember kicking a grenade one day. It didn’t explode, and I was very thankful. [But] what I wanted to do was to tell the larger story of the landmines. Right after the war, there was an estimate of 500 Cambodians stepping on landmines every month. I believe the number is about 45,000 amputees in Cambodia. I worked for a center that manufactured prosthetic limbs for victims of landmines and victims of war, and we fitted more than 26,000 people …. That [scene] may not entirely be my experience, but it was many Cambodians’ experience. We took a bit of this and a bit of that.

    AJ: That is in the book. It’s from your experiences, but the details and the precision became very specific to illustrating the bigger picture. I have a place in Cambodia and we found over 48 landmines [on the property], in a bunker.

    Angelina, you seem to be gravitating more toward directing and are very careful with the projects you take on, making films of substance — such as this new one. Is directing something you intend to continue with?

    AJ: Well, if [Loung] keeps writing … [laughs]. I would love to. Acting is such a wonderful job. You can jump in for a few months and play and be a piece of something. When you direct, you have to commit years of your life. You have to be a part of every single aspect and make sure it gets done. You have to love and commit to it in a very different way. There’s nothing, at this moment, that has a story that could be a film. We’ll see when it comes. I hope it hits me. But right now, I’m still very much in this one.

    http://www.independent.com/news/2017/oct/05/angelina-jolie-first-they-killed-my-father/

  • Lesley Starkey

    Great interview in the Santa Barbara Independent:

    Thursday, October 5, 2017

    By Josef Woodard

    Never mind the nattering scuttlebutting and the tabloid “fake news” cycles concerning Angelina Jolie at the moment. What matters now in the famed actress/director/producer’s life is the fact that she has just expanded her impressive filmography as a director, following In the Land of Blood and Honey, Unbroken, and By the Sea, by one, with the engrossing and important new Netflix film First They Killed My Father. What she has wrought is one of the most affecting and, by nature, harrowing — yet also beautiful — cinematic accounts of the Khmer Rouge’s reign of genocidal terror during the 1970s, during which an estimated quarter of the nation’s population of seven million was killed.

    It’s a personal project on various levels. Jolie first traveled to Cambodia in 2000, while filming Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001), and fell in love with the country, its culture, and its people. She ended up adopting her eldest son, Maddox, a Cambodian orphan. Around the same time, she met her friend, the author Loung Ung, whose book — about her own experience as a child, from 1975 to ’78, during the Khmer Rouge atrocities — is the basis of the new film.

    The pair wrote the screenplay together, and eventually marshalled the resources to create the film in the country and in its native Khmer language, with the help of respected Cambodian filmmaker Rithy Panh. Among the movie’s numerous points of distinction is a remarkable, poised performance of Loung as a young girl, by Sreymoch Sareum, and captivating visuals from cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle that capture the resplendent natural beauty of a country that has also known the depths of tragedy.

    Presently, the film can be streamed on Netflix, and it has had theatrical runs in select markets. It deserves big-screen and Oscar consideration — having been chosen as Cambodia’s Academy Awards nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.

    Jolie and Ung were in Santa Barbara recently, to speak after a screening of the film via the Cinema Society program of the Santa Barbara International Film Festival (SBIFF), with a post-movie Q&A by SBIFF head Roger Durling. During the screening, the pair sat down for an interview with the Santa Barbara Independent over lunch in their bungalow at the El Encanto, where the stunning ocean view and ample creature comforts seemed a world away from the horrors portrayed on the screen.

    You have created a very powerful film. I knew about the Khmer Rouge tragedy, but you dealt with it in such a subtle way. With war films, there is the temptation to resort to explicit and excessive violence, but you don’t go that route. Was that a conscious decision?

    Angelina Jolie (AJ): Well, as much as it was about coming to terms with history and making sure that the country that doesn’t often speak about these issues speaks about it, and that young people are educated about the horrors, equally, it was about Cambodian family, culture, love. That’s what should always live on, beyond war.

    Loung Ung (LU): As a survivor and a writer, it was important for me to tell the story of the love that you hold on to, the love that helps you survive. I never wanted to write a book about war. I wanted to write about what it takes to survive a war, to honor my family … I keep a journal. I’ve been writing for a long time. When I started thinking about publishing my work, after Pol Pot died in 1998, in one of his interviews, he said he did what he did “for love.” I wanted to negate that policy. Love does not a genocide make. Love does not result in 1.7-2 million Cambodians dead. I wanted to tell a story of what love looks like, with a father, a mother, brothers and sisters, and survival and grace and joy and faith. That’s how I wrote my book.

    Loung, you lived through this story. What was it like the first time you saw the finished film on a big screen? Was that a particularly emotional event?

    LU: It was. I had incredible gratitude. Outside of the immediate sadness and anger, the spirituality of the film touched me. The opening scene of the family sitting down together for dinner may seem very ordinary for many people. But for me, it was almost as if my family had come back to life. I don’t have that image of my family in that way. And to see them alive and happy and eating a meal together was something very beautiful. That completely tore me apart, because you miss it.

    Apart from The Killing Fields, the astonishing story of the Khmer Rouge hasn’t entered the realm of film very often. Has the subject been dealt with much in Cambodian film?

    AJ: Rithy (Panh), our producer, has [dealt with it]. He makes extraordinary documentaries. Things had to come together for the country to come together, to be able to deal with it, in the right time and the right place. It was important to make this in-country. The Killing Fields was shot in the Philippines, and it was in English. I loved The Killing Fields. It’s one of my favorite movies. But it didn’t bring me as close as I wanted.

    [Loung’s] book brought me inside a family and brought me inside Cambodia …. Nothing of this size has been shot in this country, or in the language of Khmer. I believe very strongly in languages and am concerned about languages disappearing. It’s very important that films are made in foreign languages, for that country. I understand the idea of adjusting for the masses, on occasion. But it’s equally important to do it as it is, and as it truly speaks to the people in their tongue.

    What about how this film will play out with a general public? There is that fear of reading among a general moviegoing public.

    AJ: I’m hoping that people give it a chance. It’s also not packed full of dialogue, so you’re not spending a lot of time [reading]. It’s interesting how you can put a subtitle over a moment and an image, and it becomes something even stronger, when you see certain words and a certain face. In this particular film, it was important where the words would come in and how they’d land, which could become part of the experience and not something where you’re competing with the screen.

    It’s wonderful that Netflix has put this out to so many different countries, in a way that’s accessible to younger people. A lot of people who stream TV shows maybe are not as much in the habit of watching foreign films. I hope that this will expand the viewing of foreign films, to a different audience, in a new way.

    Loung, there are some key scenes in the film, and I wondered how true they were to your own experience, or if it was creative, cinematic license at work. I’m thinking of the powerful landmine scene. Was there a situation where you found yourself in a field of landmines?

    LU: I worked on the landmines campaign for 10 years, in America. I certainly had experiences walking alone where there were landmines, and have known people blown up by landmines. I remember kicking a grenade one day. It didn’t explode, and I was very thankful. [But] what I wanted to do was to tell the larger story of the landmines. Right after the war, there was an estimate of 500 Cambodians stepping on landmines every month. I believe the number is about 45,000 amputees in Cambodia. I worked for a center that manufactured prosthetic limbs for victims of landmines and victims of war, and we fitted more than 26,000 people …. That [scene] may not entirely be my experience, but it was many Cambodians’ experience. We took a bit of this and a bit of that.

    AJ: That is in the book. It’s from your experiences, but the details and the precision became very specific to illustrating the bigger picture. I have a place in Cambodia and we found over 48 landmines [on the property], in a bunker.

    Angelina, you seem to be gravitating more toward directing and are very careful with the projects you take on, making films of substance — such as this new one. Is directing something you intend to continue with?

    AJ: Well, if [Loung] keeps writing … [laughs]. I would love to. Acting is such a wonderful job. You can jump in for a few months and play and be a piece of something. When you direct, you have to commit years of your life. You have to be a part of every single aspect and make sure it gets done. You have to love and commit to it in a very different way. There’s nothing, at this moment, that has a story that could be a film. We’ll see when it comes. I hope it hits me. But right now, I’m still very much in this one.

    http://www.independent.com/news/2017/oct/05/angelina-jolie-first-they-killed-my-father/

  • plez
  • http://www.amazon.com/Aubrey-Anderson/e/B01BHC8VMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1466893529&sr=8-1 Lady Valeria

    Beck–

    About your earlier comment about JD being the backbone of the Pirates films…….he is, but I think that they are trying to move away from him into prequels and sequels. In the latest film, if you saw the trailer, they introduced two new characters. The two new characters–one was a guy, who is Will (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth’s (Keira Knightley) son……….and then the new female character, instead of being a random love interest (like I thought), is actually the daughter of Captain Barbossa.

    Given how much $$$ he’s cost them with putting off production by getting drunk and injuring himself, how messy he is getting, etc……….I would not be surprised if they just wrote him off, and brought the series forward with new characters (which they will probably do anyway). I also didn’t know they based the films off of a stupid ride they created at the park/Disney world (whatever the difference is!).

  • Felinelilly

    Lord have mercy he is so good-looking. I don’t mean just his physical looks but just the way he carries himself. His whole demeanor is just chill and… dang.

  • http://www.amazon.com/Aubrey-Anderson/e/B01BHC8VMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1466893529&sr=8-1 Lady Valeria

    You know she’s only considered attractive because she’s relatively thin (she seems really thick waisted to me, but I guess that’s because it’s not “in” for the rich WASP crowd to be curvy………so she’s not going to “fix” that via plastic surgery), blonde, small ish nose, and big boobs. You could be ugly as sin, and some polo wearing douche would still want her because she “looks right” with their crowd.

  • Passing Through

    The headline made it sound like Brad was shirtless. Sheesh.

  • http://www.amazon.com/Aubrey-Anderson/e/B01BHC8VMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1466893529&sr=8-1 Lady Valeria

    LOL, you perv!

  • Passing Through

    Nah, they’re not going to dump Depp. Jack Sparrow is the only reason Pirates is a franchise. There’s nobody else they can hinge a $230MIL extravaganza on – or even a $100MIL film. And you have to give Depp credit for mostly keeping his OTT shite on the down low since Artiste put him on blast with that divorce and his former managers countersued because he’s a financial mess. Hes’ very much aware that his BO numbers are down and that he has to watch his public image or his Fantastic Beasts gig is in danger – as well as his $20MIL Invisible Man payday. And you know Depp values nothing more than he values money…and over-accessorizing…which he can’t do without…money…

  • Passing Through

    Well, it says “shows off his toned bod.” That makes it sound like he’s shirtless or nude or something. He’s fully clothed…although…I will say…Weng’s internet must be broken because she hasn’t commented on Brad’s peen yet…

  • Passing Through

    I’ll say this much for Ivanka – she’s a normal-sized woman and not starving herself to be stick thin.

    PS – She’s not a “WASP” anymore…she converted to Judaism for Kushner…but I get what you mean…

  • http://www.amazon.com/Aubrey-Anderson/e/B01BHC8VMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1466893529&sr=8-1 Lady Valeria

    LOL I am a perv too, because that was my first thought (on Brad’s package)………

  • http://www.amazon.com/Aubrey-Anderson/e/B01BHC8VMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1466893529&sr=8-1 Lady Valeria

    I wonder if his contract is up after the 6th film? I haven’t heard anything about it, so that’s why I thought they may be trying to cut their losses on him. But then I can also see doing another film with him and then the two other characters I mentioned i.e. Will and Elizabeth’s son, and then Barbossa’s daughter………and jumping off with that to start a new franchise (which will probably fail miserably because JD IS the best of the films, lol……but that won’t stop them from trying!)…………….

    And ugh, all of his damn enablers make me SICK. As soon as he started blaming THEM for him spending too much money, then they turned around and admitted that he abused Amber and lied about it.

  • http://www.amazon.com/Aubrey-Anderson/e/B01BHC8VMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1466893529&sr=8-1 Lady Valeria

    Girl, just wait until all this is over. I bet you even their rabbi is going to throw them out of the synagogue.

  • 81a

    That man looks goooooood!
    And I miss seeing him with his wife Angie 😭😭😭

  • Passing Through

    It’s a sad day when Weng doesn’t come out of lurking so her vag can leer…

  • Passing Through

    I think Depp will do the movies as long as they’re willing to pay him 20MIL+backend. He’d literally have to be in jail for them to stop putting him in the Pirates moves.

    Back up a sec – which of his enablers admitted that he’d abused Artiste? Cuz I missed that. Was this after his managers filed that addendum saying if he wanted his money back then he needed to sue all of his hangers on who bled him dry instead of them? LOL!

  • http://www.amazon.com/Aubrey-Anderson/e/B01BHC8VMI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1466893529&sr=8-1 Lady Valeria

    I say that with the caveat that it was in THR? I think…….but basically one of the managers that he was suing…….but it may have been a “a source close to” or “a friend of”…….I can’t remember exactly, but I do not believe it was a direct quote. I do think it was from them, because before all of the “sources” and “friends” were saying Amber was lying or she was a golddigger, etc………….and now they’re the exact opposite.

  • William Bradley & The Jolie

    Hello All.

    Well, alright Mr. Bradley.

    I see you. That body is looking all kinds of right.

    And swagger in effect.

    How old is he again?

  • William Bradley & The Jolie

    I don’t know about any body else, but I can’t wait for the press tour for this film.

    Can you imagine Brad and Grumpy Lee, not here for you or your Bullshiite, Jones …

    together? Being interviewed …

    This guy?

    http://thefw.com/files/2013/01/grumpy-tommy1.jpg

    I am going to get my everlasting LIFE.

  • William Bradley & The Jolie

    Alright, who did Pigstein piss off?

    Cause the NEW YORK TIMES, is coming for him.

    Forget those other publications, it’s the Times he has to worry about.

    But why now? What, or who, set this off?

    But this could be epic.

    AW even has a separate thread up in anticipation.

  • bap

    First They Killed My Father” Strikes a Chord With Cambodian Audiences
    05 October 2017
    Sokummono Khan
    Nov Povleakhena
    VOA Khmer

    A movie-goer is checking his phone await the screening of “First They Killed My Father” at Major Cineplex Cinema, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on September 21st, 2017. (Khan Sokummono/VOA Khmer)
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    “Talking about the film and remembering it again, right now, I feel goosebumps,” Ms. Siv Teng said, rubbing her arms.
    PHNOM PENH —
    Cambodians flocked to Buddhist pagodas last week to pay respect to the spirits of their ancestors during the Pchum Ben holiday, but some also communed with the ghosts of the past in a different way: through film.
    The new Hollywood movie “First They Killed my Father,” directed by Angelina Jolie and based on a memoir by Khmer Rouge survivor Loung Ung, was released in theaters on September 8, and has been playing to packed houses.
    The film was the first Hollywood film to be shot entirely in the Khmer language, on location in Cambodia. At screenings attended by VOA Khmer, local viewers responded strongly to the film’s narrative, whispering animatedly to family members when onscreen moments reminded them of their own lives, and laughing at the screenplay’s few moments of levity.
    Many wept openly at the film’s portrayal of the brutality and privations of the Khmer Rouge regime, which saw more than 1.7 million Cambodians perish due to executions, forced labor, and starvation. But they burst into applause when the film ended on a hopeful note, with Loung and four of her siblings reuniting to perform a traditional Buddhist memorial ceremony for the spirits of their parents and dead sisters.
    After the screenings, theatergoers said they were moved by the film’s emphasis on the endurance of family relationships across time and space. Some said it helped them better understand their own ancestors, living and dead, and planned to use the story of Loung as a jumping-off point to discuss their own family history.
    Two-thirds of Cambodians were born after the fall of the Khmer Rouge in 1979, and often struggle to comprehend the magnitude of their parents’ and grandparents’ suffering. It is equally hard for parents to convey the scope of history to their children, said Nheb Ngi Veng, 62, who watched the movie with his wife and two sons.
    As a young boy in peaceful 1960s Cambodia, he found it impossible to believe his mother’s tales of the cruelty of Khmer Issarak guerilla fighters marauding through the countryside. Today his own sons, in their 20s, are equally incredulous about his stories of the Khmer Rouge regime, during which he did heavy forced labor in the countryside.
    “It still sounds unbelievable to me that Cambodia ever fell so low like this,” he said.
    His wife, Suy Siv Teng, 58, who emerged from the theater gripping the hands of their two sons, said the movie had brought back chilling memories for her. In particular, she was struck by the deep emotion in the scene when Loung’s mother ordered her children to leave her and pretend to be orphans. The move saved their lives, but she would die without seeing them again.
    “Talking about the film and remembering it again, right now, I feel goosebumps,” Ms. Siv Teng said, rubbing her arms.
    In April 1975, when the Khmer Rouge stormed Phnom Penh, she was living in the capital as a student. When communist soldiers ordered the city’s inhabitants to leave immediately, she thought the evacuation would be temporary. Instead, she did not return for years.
    “I told my sons when we were watching the film how I brought nothing but some books for studying, because I was afraid I would not be able to keep up with my class when I came back,” she said. “Unfortunately we could not come back and I was ordered to throw away the books.”
    In interviews, Angelina Jolie has emphasized that a key goal of “First They Killed My Father” was to capture a child’s eye perspective on war, famine and genocide.

    Actress and filmmaker Angelina Jolie (left) and Cambodian-American Loung Ung, author of “First They Killed My Father,” give an exclusive interview to VOA Khmer following a press conference about the premiere of the upcoming Netflix film in Siem Reap province. (Neou Vannarin/VOA Khmer)
    Preap Lina, who is in her 40s, spent the formative years of her childhood living under Khmer Rouge rule. Last week she brought 11 of her children, nieces, and nephews to see the film, saying she was glad to finally have the chance to show them what her early life was like.
    “I just want to remind them of those experiences I used to face when I was young, which the young generation thinks could not have happened,” she said.
    One of her daughters, 22-year-old Rath Panhanita, said her mother often urged her to toughen up. After watching the film, which showed a young girl forced to labor in rice paddies and plant grenades as a child soldier, she said she could understand that perspective better.
    “Mom wanted us to see that generation, how difficult it was, wanted us to come to understand it, so we will not be so fussy,” she said. “That means that in a difficult situation, we must overcome it, like they did in their generation.”
    The scene that depicts Loung’s father being marched away by soldiers, ultimately to be executed, also made a vivid impression on Ms. Panhanita.
    “I love my father just like that girl loved her father,” she said. “Imagine how I would feel if my father was taken away like that.”
    Not everybody was eager to see their painful experiences replayed on the big screen. Chan Lyda, 28, an online marketer, said the Khmer Rouge era was still so raw for her parents that they refused to come see the film with her.
    But even without their presence, the movie gave her a new sense of empathy for what they had gone through, she said. Her parents often told her about how difficult their early lives were, about the years when they had no possessions but their “bare hands.” But to her, these were just stories.
    Ms. Lyda still does not have a good sense of what happened to her parents during the Khmer Rouge years, or how many of her family members died. But after seeing the film, she was clear about what the experience must have been like.
    “If I were under that regime, I would not be alive,” she concluded. “It was miserable. People were forced to work very hard and starved.”

    https://www.voacambodia.com/a/first-they-killed-my-father-strikes-a-chord-with-cambodian-audienes/4057340.html

  • Felinelilly

    LOL. You reminded me of this article I read recently about Jim Carrey saying TLJ hated him when they were filming Batman. He literally told JC that he hated him and couldn’t stand his buffoonery or something like that. LOL So yeah Grumpy has no time for anyone’s bullshit. LOL
    And yeah I agree, it would be great to see him and Brad interviewed together.

  • bap

    PLAY TRAILER
    The Breadwinner (2017)

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  • William Bradley & The Jolie

    LOL

    Oh, really? About Jim Carrey? Dang, GLJ stepped to him like that?

    I’ll have to check that out.

    YESSSSS.

    Grumpy Ca, I mean, Lee is not here for it

    Oh, this could be so good.

  • Felinelilly

    Yeah I read two different articles about it, recent ones where JC himself told the story on some radio show or something. LOL If I find an article again I’ll link it for you.

  • Felinelilly